The Fate of the Furious (F. Gary Gray, 2017)

car crush

Especially in a time where franchises are getting only more complex, more bloated, it is interesting to consider the evolution of such a hugely successful movie series as The Fast and the Furious. Originally a comparatively “small” franchise focused exclusively on street racing, it has ballooned into an insane, globe-trotting mesh of spycraft and ensemble drama. I have only seen the previous incarnation of this series, Furious 7, but it is clear that the franchise has become much more (for better and worse) than its humble origins: from box office alone, Furious 7 grossed twice the amount of its predecessor, for more reasons than the untimely demise of franchise star Paul Walker.

So what step in the series’ evolution does The Fate of the Furious take? Quite simply, it doubles down on the core, car-fueled action. While the previous installment featured no small amount of hand-to-hand combat and gunplay (even bringing Tony Jaa for a fairly small role), Fate is, for better or worse, focused on races and chases. As a result, the movie more than delivers on the requisite amount of vehicular destruction across several countries and types of terrain.

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Your Name. (Makoto Shinkai, 2016)

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Makoto Shinkai’s latest anime smashed records across Asia last fall, becoming the highest grossing Japanese film in the history of China and Thailand, the second highest grossing Japanese film in Japanese history (behind Spirited Away), the worldwide top-grossing anime ever and the eighth highest grossing traditionally-animated film of all-time. Finally opening across North America this week, it has a chance to add to that record, and I think we’re all pulling for it to raise that extra $20 million it needs to overtake Pocahontas. Like his highly-acclaimed short features 5 Centimeters per Second (2007) and The Garden of Words (2013), it’s a story of two young people attempting to forge a connection. Romantically, yes, but also metaphysically. Apparently caused by the appearance of a comet close to the Earth, country girl Mitsuha and city boy Taki begin switching bodies: sometimes they wake up inhabiting the other, sometimes they don’t. This is bewildering, but eventually they figure out its rhythms and turns out to be quite fun. And funny: Taki’s teenaged boy obsession with his own (sort-of) breasts is perhaps the film’s truest note. Things reach a crisis point when the comet reaches its closest point and the body-switching ceases, sending each character in desperate search of the real-life other, complicated by the fact that they keep forgetting the other person’s existence.

Your Name. isn’t quite as other-worldly gorgeous as those two earlier films (they’re the only two other features I’ve seen from Shinkai), it’s combination of hand-drawn, computer and rotoscoped animation is a little more conventional, just as its plot and approach to narrative is a little more familiar. 5 Centimeters per Second was a trilogy of vignettes about a couple who loved each other once but where split apart by geography, and their attempts and failures to reconnect over a lifetime. The Garden of Words was about the Platonic love between a depressed teacher and a fifteen year old student. Your Name. unites these two in splitting its heroes in both time and space, human connection being so difficult that truly achieving it involves breaking the known laws of physics. The tragedy of the film comes from the loss of memory: human brains are unreliable and fungible, and the omnipresent devices with think makes us more interconnected are even more fragile. Tradition and ritual though unite us with a past we cannot comprehend. Mitsuha is part of a long family line of makers of braided cords, who specially prepare a kind of saké as an offering for an unnamed god. They’ve forgotten the reasons for the rituals, but they perform them nonetheless. Where every other device of history and communication (cell phone, history book, museum photograph) fails, the braided cord, explicitly a metaphor for the dense and incomprehensible construction of space-time, persists.

Friday April 7 – Thursday April 13

Featured Film:

Makoto Shinkai’s Your Name.

The latest film from the master of sentimental anime finally opens here in the US after smashing box office records last fall throughout Asia. Shinkai is a maker of supernaturally gorgeous romances like 2007’s 5 Centimeters per Second and 2013’s The Garden of Words, and the unusually punctuated Your Name. appears to follow in this vein. Based on his own novel, it’s about a pair of teenagers, country girl and city boy, who begin intermittently switching bodies. It’s playing in both English and the original Japanese at various theatres around town, be sure to check the listings to make sure you get the proper version.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Your Name. (Makoto Shinkai) Fri-Thurs Our Review
John Wick: Chapter 2 (Chad Stahelski) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Hidden Figures (Theodore Melfi) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Prison (Kim Rae-won & Han Suk-kyu) Fri-Thurs

Central Cinema:

Ghostbusters (Ivan Reitman, 1984) Fri-Mon, Weds
Friday (F. Gary Gray, 1995) Fri-Mon
Blood Diner (Jackie Kong, 1987) Tues Only

SIFF Egyptian:

Raw (Julia Ducournau) Fri-Thurs
Danger Diva (Robert McGinley) Thurs Only World Premiere, Live Performance by Thunderpussy

Century Federal Way:

Clue (Jonathan Lynn, 1985) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Personal Shopper (Olivier Assayas) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Land of Mine (Martin Pieter Zandvliet) Fri-Thurs
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Tues
Brazil (Terry Gilliam, 1985) Sat Only
Ixcanul (Jayro Bustamante, 2015) Sun Only Our Review
Venice (Kiki Alvarez, 2014) Mon Only
Antarctica: Ice & Sky (Luc Jacquet) Tues Only
Real Boy (Shaleece Haas) Thurs Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

The Void (Jeremy Gillespie & Steven Kostanski) Fri-Thurs
Kizumonogatari Part 3: Reiketsu (Tatsuya Oishi & Akiyuki Shinbo) Sat-Mon Only

Landmark Guild 45th:

Your Name. (Makoto Shinkai) Fri-Thurs Our Review Subtitled or Dubbed in English, Check Listings
Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Your Name. (Makoto Shinkai) Fri-Thurs Our Review Subtitled or Dubbed in English, Check Listings
Cheliyaa (Mani Ratnam) Fri-Thurs Telugu
Kaatru Veliyidai (Mani Ratnam) Fri-Thurs Tamil
Guru (Sudha K Prasad) Fri-Thurs
Clue (Jonathan Lynn, 1985) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Trainspotting 2 (Danny Boyle) Fri-Thurs

Northwest Film Forum:

Cinemania (Angela Christlieb & Stephen Kijak, 2002) Fri Only 35mm
I Called Him Morgan (Kasper Collin) Starts Thurs
Surround Sound Laydown Sat Only Live music, film screening, and poetry reading!
Apple Pie (Sam Hamilton) Sun Only
A Roll for Peter Thurs Only

AMC Oak Tree:

1 Mile to You (Leif Tilden) Fri-Thurs

AMC Pacific Place:

La La Land (Damien Chazelle) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Devotion of Suspect X (Alec Su) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Song to Song (Terrence Malick) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Hidden Figures (Theodore Melfi) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Northern Lights: A Journey to Love (Dondon S. Santos) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

Tokyo Story (Yasujiro Ozu, 1953) Thurs Only 35mm

Landmark Seven Gables:

Frantz (François Ozon) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

As You Are (Miles Joris-Peyrafitte) Fri-Sun Only
All That Heaven Allows (Douglas Sirk, 1955) Tues Only

AMC Southcenter:

Your Name. (Makoto Shinkai) Fri-Thurs Our Review Subtitled Only

Sundance Cinemas:

Personal Shopper (Olivier Assayas) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs

Regal Thornton Place:

Your Name. (Makoto Shinkai) Fri-Thurs Our Review

SIFF Uptown:

Your Name. (Makoto Shinkai) Fri-Thurs Our Review Subtitled Only
Trainspotting 2 (Danny Boyle) Fri-Thurs

Varsity Theatre:

Aftermath (Elliott Lester) Fri-Thurs
The Assignment (Walter Hill) Fri-Thurs

Queen of the Desert (Werner Herzog, 2015)

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Werner Herzog’s biopic of British archeologist Gertrude Bell premiered more than two years ago at the Berlin Film Festival to poor reviews, and is only this week making its way onto American screens. Why this should be is not immediately clear, the ins and outs of which international art house films make it into domestic distribution is far too complex a matter for my mind to comprehend, but I believe it involves some combination of corporate nepotism, the star system and random chance. The stars in this case are what make the film worth watching, as Nicole Kidman can enliven even the deadest of features, and this might be her most heroic effort in that vein to date. There’s almost nothing of Werner Herzog in the film, though there might have been once: Bell superficially appears to be his kind of a hero, obsessed with a harsh landscape, driven outside the bounds of society to do something remarkable, but at nearly every level the film feels compromised. Herzog is the only credited writer, but this has all the hallmarks of a film written and edited by a committee.

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Song to Song (Terrence Malick, 2017)

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Making its way to Seattle last week for an unheralded run at the Pacific Place, then quickly dropped to a single show in town and shunted off to Tukwila’s Parkway Plaza was the latest film from the most singular artist working in mainstream American film today. As with every Terrence Malick film since his reemergence with 1998’s The Thin Red LineSong to Song has been met with baffled derision by much of what passes for the Hollywood intelligentsia, that dense Ouroboros of movie reviewers, Oscar bloggers and self-appointed box office gurus that pass as journalists in our debased world. The complaints are familiar, cheap and lazy, ultimately sourced in the fact that Malick doesn’t make movies like They expect movies to be made. Unable to conceive of possibilities beyond their narrow imaginations, his refusal to conform is viewed alternately as pretension or incompetence (see for example Christopher Plummer’s whining about Malick during The Tree of Life‘s Oscar campaign that Malick didn’t know how to edit films, a complaint (I believe, perhaps uncharitably) ultimately sourced in the fact that Malick cut out most of Plummer’s performance in The New World). Malick doesn’t make conventional movies, and it’s easier to snark about twirling and poetry (the nerve!) than it is to wrestle with what he does make.

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Friday March 31 – Thursday April 6

Featured Film:

After Hours at the Grand Illusion

SAM’s got Yasujiro Ozu’s unimpeachable Early Summer playing on 35mm Thursday night, and the Central Cinema has a fine double feature for our times of Nazi-punching and conspiratorial malevolence with Raiders of the Lost Ark and They Live, but if I’m going to a movie this April Fool’s Day, it’s gotta be Martin Scorsese’s After Hours on 35 at the Grand Illusion. Griffin Dunne plays a mild-mannered office drone who in his more or less innocent quest to just meet a nice girl gets sucked through the looking glass into a nightmarish world of a city that refuses to operate by conventional standards of decency and logic. With Teri Garr, Linda Fiorentino, Rosanna Arquette, Catherine O’Hara and more as the agents of his doom, it’s tremendously fun. One of the great director’s best and most underrated films.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Personal Shopper (Olivier Assayas) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs
Katamarayudu (Kishore Kumar Pardasani) Fri-Thurs
John Wick: Chapter 2 (Chad Stahelski) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Hidden Figures (Theodore Melfi) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Prison (Kim Rae-won & Han Suk-kyu) Fri-Thurs

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

A United Kingdom (Amma Asante) Fri-Thurs

Central Cinema:

Raiders of the Lost Ark (Steven Spielberg, 1982) Fri-Mon, Weds
They Live (John Carpenter, 1988) Fri-Weds

SIFF Egyptian:

Raw (Julia Ducournau) Fri-Thurs

Century Federal Way:

The Prison (Kim Rae-won & Han Suk-kyu) Fri-Thurs
Raab Da Radio ( Harry Bhatti & Tarnvir Singh Jagpal) Fri-Thurs
North By Northwest (Alfred Hitchcock, 1959) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs
A United Kingdom (Amma Asante) Fri-Thurs
The Red Turtle (Michaël Dudok de Wit) Fri-Thurs
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001) Sat Only
Alamar (Pedro González-Rubio, 2009) Mon Only
1984 (Michael Radford, 1984) Tues Only
Deconstructing the Beatles: Revolver (Scott Freiman) Thurs Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Paterson (Jim Jarmusch) Sat-Mon, Weds & Thurs Our Review Our Other Review
After Hours (Martin Scorsese, 1985) Fri, Sat & Tues Only 35mm
San Francisco Cable Cars
 (Strephon Taylor) Sun Only Filmmaker in Attendance

Landmark Guild 45th:

Trainspotting 2 (Danny Boyle) Fri-Thurs
Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Raajakumara (Santhosh Ananddram) Fri-Thurs
Katamarayudu (Kishore Kumar Pardasani) Fri-Thurs
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs
For Here or To Go? (Rucha Humnabadkar, 2015) Fri-Thurs
Guru (Sudha K Prasad) Fri-Thurs
Naam Shabana (Shivam Nair) Fri-Thurs
North By Northwest (Alfred Hitchcock, 1959) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Trainspotting 2 (Danny Boyle) Fri-Thurs

Northwest Film Forum:

Contemporary Color (Bill Ross IV & Turner Ross) Fri-Sun
The Films of Daichi Saito Sat Only Filmmaker in Attendance
Strike a Pose (Ester Gould & Reijer Zwaan) Weds Only
Cinemania (Angela Christlieb & Stephen Kijak, 2002) Thurs & Fri Only 35mm
I Called Him Morgan (Kasper Collin) Starts Thurs

AMC Oak Tree:

Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs

AMC Pacific Place:

Song to Song (Terrence Malick) Fri-Thurs
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs
La La Land (Damien Chazelle) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Devotion of Suspect X (Alec Su) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Song to Song (Terrence Malick) Fri-Thurs
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs
Northern Lights: A Journey to Love (Dondon S. Santos) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

Early Summer (Yasujiro Ozu, 1951) Thurs Only 35mm Our Podcast

Landmark Seven Gables:

Frantz (François Ozon) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

Deconstructing the Beatles: Revolver (Scott Freiman) Fri-Sun Only
Magnificent Obsession (Douglas Sirk, 1954) Tues Only

Sundance Cinemas:

Personal Shopper (Olivier Assayas) Fri-Thurs Our Review 
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Uptown:

Frantz (François Ozon) Fri-Thurs
Trainspotting 2 (Danny Boyle) Fri-Thurs
1984 (Michael Radford, 1984) Tues Only

Varsity Theatre:

I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Land of Mine (Martin Pieter Zandvliet) Fri-Thurs
North By Northwest (Alfred Hitchcock, 1959) Weds Only

Friday March 24 – Thursday March 30

Featured Film:

Song to Song at the Pacific Place

Surprisingly absolutely no one, the latest film from Terrence Malick has proven to be divisive among critics and audiences. If you happen to be one of those people who think that not only are his early films (Badlands and Days of Heaven) great, but so are his middle films The Thin Red Line and The New World) and his late films (The Tree of Life, To the Wonder and Knight of Cups), and we here at Seattle Screen Scene most definitely are in that camp, then the unheralded release of Song to Song, opening with no advance publicity at the Pacific Place this week, is a cause of both extreme consternation and great excitement. If Malick, or just late Malick, is not your cup of tea, then by all means do not miss the next film up in SAM’s Ozu series, Late Spring, playing on 35mm on Thursday. The rest of us will be happily twirling twirling twirling into the AMC.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Personal Shopper (Olivier Assayas) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs
Katamarayudu (Kishore Kumar Pardasani) Fri-Thurs
John Wick: Chapter 2 (Chad Stahelski) Fri-Thurs Our Review
La La Land (Damien Chazelle) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Split (M. Night Shyamalan) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Central Cinema:

Sunset Blvd. (Billy Wilder, 1950) Fri-Weds
Being John Malkovich (Spike Jonze, 1999) Fri-Weds

Century Federal Way:

Katamarayudu (Kishore Kumar Pardasani) Fri-Thurs
Phillauri (Anshai Lal) Fri-Thurs
The Karate Kid (John G. Avildsen, 1984) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs
A United Kingdom (Amma Asante) Fri-Thurs
The Sense of an Ending (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Lost Highway (David Lynch, 1997) Sat Only
Wolf Totem (Jean-Jacques Annaud, 2015) Mon Only
Jaws (Steven Spielberg, 1975) Tues Only
The Fog of War (Errol Morris, 2003) Thurs Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Paterson (Jim Jarmusch) Sat-Mon, Weds & Thurs Our Review Our Other Review
Suntan (Argyris Papadimitropoulos) Fri-Thurs
Saturday Secret Matinees: Presented by the Sprocket Society
 (Various directors & years) Sat Only 16mm
A Tale of Two Cities: Portland & Seattle Tues Only

Landmark Guild 45th:

Trainspotting 2 (Danny Boyle) Fri-Thurs
The Sense of an Ending (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs
Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Badrinath Ki Dulhania (Shashank Khaitan) Fri-Thurs
Katamarayudu (Kishore Kumar Pardasani) Fri-Thurs
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs
The Karate Kid (John G. Avildsen, 1984) Sun & Weds Only

Northwest Film Forum:

The Land of the Enlightened (Pieter-Jan De Pue) Fri-Sun
Homeland: Iraq Year Zero (Abbas Fahdel, 2015) Sat & Sun Only
Strike a Pose (Ester Gould & Reijer Zwaan) Weds & Thurs Only
Contemporary Color (Bill Ross IV & Turner Ross) Thurs-Sun

AMC Oak Tree:

Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs

AMC Pacific Place:

Song to Song (Terrence Malick) Fri-Thurs
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs
La La Land (Damien Chazelle) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Seattle Jewish Film Festival Fri-Sun Only Full Program

Regal Parkway Plaza:

I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Slamma Jamma (Tim Chey) Fri-Thurs
The Sense of an Ending (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs
Katamarayudu (Kishore Kumar Pardasani) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

Late Spring (Yasujiro Ozu, 1949) Thurs Only 35mm

Landmark Seven Gables:

Land of Mine (Martin Pieter Zandvliet) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

The Lure (Agnieszka Smoczynska) Fri-Sun Only Our Review
Post Alley Film Festival Sat Only Full Program

AMC Southcenter:

Sword Art Online The Movie – Ordinal Scale (Tomohiko Itō) Fri-Thurs
The Red Turtle (Michaël Dudok de Wit) Fri-Thurs

Sundance Cinemas:

Personal Shopper (Olivier Assayas) Fri-Thurs Our Review 
The Last Word (Mark Pellington) Fri-Thurs
Wilson (Craig Johnson) Fri-Thurs
All Nighter (Gavin Wiesen) Fri-Thurs
Donald Cried (Kristopher Avedisian) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Uptown:

Personal Shopper (Olivier Assayas) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Trainspotting 2 (Danny Boyle) Fri-Thurs
The Salesman (Asghar Farhadi) Fri-Thurs
Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs
Seattle Jewish Film Festival Mon-Thurs Only Full Program

Varsity Theatre:

I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck) Fri-Thurs Our Review

In Wide Release:

Hidden Figures (Theodore Melfi) Our Review

Personal Shopper (Olivier Assayas, 2016)

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For a film as surprisingly dense and multi-faceted as Personal Shopper, it is first important to consider exactly what comprises the work. It is at once a subtle exploration of grief and a glimpse into the unknown, a thriller at times bordering on horror and a relentlessly lowkey experience that borders on parodying the cliches of a normal viewer’s notion of a French arthouse film, and a movie that both embraces and rejects what ultimately becomes the film’s driving principle: spiritualism. Yet it manages to reconcile these differences to some degree or another, and the credit must be given to two incredibly well-matched collaborators: director and writer Olivier Assayas and his new muse Kristen Stewart.

It should be noted that this is Assayas’s second film with Stewart, following his previous film Clouds of Sils Maria (2014). There, Stewart played the assistant and essential foil to Juliette Binoche’s veteran actress, but in this movie she stands alone, quite literally by herself for much of the narrative. Her character is Maureen, a personal shopper living in Paris for a diva model named Kyra who is often heard (through handwritten notes) but only seen in one short sequence. Maureen is also an amateur medium, introduced in the opening minutes wandering the home of her recently deceased twin brother in the hopes of receiving a sign from the other side.

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Friday March 17 – Thursday March 23

Featured Film:

Beau travail at the Northwest Film Forum

For two days in the middle of this week (Tuesday and Wednesday to be exact) the Northwest Film Forum is showing a 35mm print of the best film from that very fine movie year 1999, Claire Denis’s Beau travail. An adaptation of Herman Melville’s novella Billy Budd, it stars Denis Levant as the commander of a French Foreign Legion troop stationed in Djibouti. He becomes increasingly obsessed with a beautiful new recruit, played by Grégoire Colin, understandable given the oppressive heat and the gorgeousness of Agnès Godard’s images of soldiers at work. The plot ends in tragedy, but the movies ends with the rhythm of the night.

Playing This Week:

Admiral Theater:

Shoulder Arms (Charles Chaplin, 1918) Weds Only
The Maltese Falcon (John Huston, 1941) Weds Only
American Graffiti (George Lucas, 1973) Weds Only

AMC Alderwood:

Bluebeard (Lee Soo-yeon) Fri-Thurs
The Sense of an Ending (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs
Split (M. Night Shyamalan) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Central Cinema:

Aliens (James Cameron, 1986) Fri-Tues

Century Federal Way:

Jindua (Navaniat Singh) Fri-Thurs
Reservoir Dogs (Quentin Tarantino, 1992) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs
A United Kingdom (Amma Asante) Fri-Thurs
The Sense of an Ending (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs
Neruda (Pablo Larraín) Fri-Thurs Our Review
ET: The Extra-Terrestrial (Steven Spielberg, 1982) Sat Only Free
The World’s End (Edgar Wright, 2013) Sat Only
All the Best (Snjezana Tribuson) Mon Only
Things to Come (Mia Hansen-Løve) Tues Only Our Review Our Other Review

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Paterson (Jim Jarmusch) Fri-Thurs Our Review Our Other Review
Saturday Secret Matinees: Presented by the Sprocket Society (Various directors & years) Sat Only 16mm
A Tale of Two Cities: Portland & Seattle Tues Only

Landmark Guild 45th:

The Sense of an Ending (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs
Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs
Tickling Giants (Sara Taksler) Tues Only

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Badrinath Ki Dulhania (Shashank Khaitan) Fri-Thurs
The Sense of an Ending (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs
Reservoir Dogs (Quentin Tarantino, 1992) Sun & Weds Only

Northwest Film Forum:

Mr. Gaga (Tomer Heymann, 2015) Fri-Sun, Weds-Thurs
The Challenge (Yuri Ancarani) Sat Only
Uncertain (Ewan McNicol & Anna Sandilands) Fri-Sun Only Director Q&A Sat
Beau travail (Claire Denis, 1999) Tues & Weds Only 35mm Our Podcast

AMC Oak Tree:

Mean Dreams (Nathan Morlando) Fri-Thurs

AMC Pacific Place:

The Sense of an Ending (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Jindua (Navaniat Singh) Fri-Thurs
The Sense of an Ending (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

The Only Son (Yasujiro Ozu, 1936) Thurs Only 35mm

Landmark Seven Gables:

A United Kingdom (Amma Asante) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

You’re Killing Me Susana (Roberto Sneider) Fri-Sun Only
Le Havre (Aki Kaurismäki, 2011) Weds Only Plus wine and pastry

AMC Southcenter:

Sword Art Online The Movie – Ordinal Scale (Tomohiko Itō) Fri-Thurs

Sundance Cinemas:

Personal Shopper (Olivier Assayas) Fri-Thurs Our Review
I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck) Fri-Thurs Our Review

SIFF Uptown:

Personal Shopper (Olivier Assayas) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Salesman (Asghar Farhadi) Fri-Thurs
Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs

Varsity Theatre:

Fittest on Earth: A Decade of Fitness (Heber Cannon, Ian Wittenber, Marston Sawyers & Mariah Moore) Fri-Thurs
Wolves (Bart Freundlich) Fri-Thurs

In Wide Release:

The Great Wall (Zhang Yimou) Our Review
John Wick: Chapter 2 (Chad Stahelski) Our Review
Hidden Figures 
(Theodore Melfi) Our Review
Fences (Denzel Washington) Our Review
La La Land (Damien Chazelle) Our Review
Moonlight 
(Barry Jenkins)  Our Review

Friday March 10 – Thursday March 16

Featured Film:

Fire Walk with Me at the Seattle Art Museum

Kicking off a Lynchian spring here in Seattle (SIFF’s retrospective launches in April) is the Seattle Art Museum’s presentation of the prequel to David Lynch’s acclaimed television series Twin Peaks. It’s playing two nights only (Friday and Saturday), the first night with a handful of special guests: Wendy Robie, Gary Hershberger, and Sheryl Lee, who gives one of cinema’s all-time great performances in the film as the doomed Laura Palmer. We talked about it last year on the first ever episode of The Frances Farmer Show, and Ryan’s got a review of it here as well.

Playing This Week:

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Central Cinema:

Goodfellas (Martin Scorsese, 1990) Fri-Weds
Serenity (Joss Whedon, 2005) Fri-Weds

Century Federal Way:

The Quiet Man (John Ford, 1952) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck) Fri-Thurs Our Review
A United Kingdom (Amma Asante) Fri-Thurs
Hot Fuzz (Edgar Wright, 2007) Sat Only
Cool & Crazy (Knut Erik Jensen, 2001) Mon Only
Sophie and the Rising Sun (Maggie Greenwald) Tues Only
West Side Story (Robert Wise & Jerome Robbins, 1961) Weds Only
I, Claude Monet (Phil Grabsky) Thurs Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Apprentice (Boo Junfeng) Fri-Thurs
Saturday Secret Matinees: Presented by the Sprocket Society (Various directors & years) Sat Only 16mm
Sword Art Online The Movie – Ordinal Scale (Tomohiko Itō) Sun & Mon Only

Landmark Guild 45th:

A United Kingdom (Amma Asante) Fri-Thurs
Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Badrinath Ki Dulhania (Shashank Khaitan) Fri-Thurs
The Quiet Man (John Ford, 1952) Sun & Weds Only

Northwest Film Forum:

Happy Hour (Ryûsuke Hamaguchi) Part II Friday Only
Festival of (In)appropriation #9 Fri Only Curator in Attendance
3rd Annual Seattle Web Fest Sat Only
Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir, 1939) Sun Only 35mm
Mr. Gaga (Tomer Heymann, 2015) Starts Weds
The Challenge (Yuri Ancarani) Thurs & Sat Only

Regal Parkway Plaza:

I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck) Fri-Thurs Our Review
My Ex and Whys (Cathy Garcia-Molina) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

Fire Walk with Me (David Lynch, 1992) Fri & Sat Only 35mm Our Review Our Podcast 
Night of the Shooting Stars (The Taviani Brothers, 1982) Thurs Only

SIFF Film Center:

My Life as a Zucchini (Claude Barras) Fri-Sun Only
The Freedom to Marry (Eddie Rosenstein) Sat Only

AMC Southcenter:

Sword Art Online The Movie – Ordinal Scale (Tomohiko Itō) Fri-Thurs
A United Kingdom (Amma Asante) Fri-Thurs

Sundance Cinemas:

I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck) Fri-Thurs Our Review

SIFF Uptown:

I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck) Fri-Weds Our Review
The Salesman (Asghar Farhadi) Fri-Thurs
Kedi (Ceyda Torun) Fri-Thurs

Varsity Theatre:

Toni Erdmann (Maren Ade) Fri-Thurs Our Review Our Other Review

In Wide Release:

The Great Wall (Zhang Yimou) Our Review
John Wick: Chapter 2 (Chad Stahelski) Our Review
Split (M. Night Shyamalan) Our Review
Hidden Figures 
(Theodore Melfi) Our Review
Fences (Denzel Washington) Our Review
La La Land (Damien Chazelle) Our Review
Moonlight 
(Barry Jenkins)  Our Review