Seattle Screen Scene Update

As all the theatres in town continue to be closed for the foreseeable future, a couple have taken to the internet. Both the Northwest Film Forum and the Grand Illusion are hosting online screenings of films they had been planning to play before the quarantine hit. The NWFF has Bacurau and Vitalina Varela along with some Local Sightings selections and more, while the Grand Illusion has Wild Goose Lake and Saint Frances. Check ’em out and help support the theatres we love.

In other news, I don’t know if Seattle Screen Scene will be returning in its old form once the quarantine ends. When we started five years ago, it was significantly harder to find information or listings about specialty releases (art house, repertory, and Chinese/Korean/Indian movies) in the city than it is now. In that sense, the weekly listings on the site have become obsolete. We’ll still keep the site going, if nothing else for its list of links to all the theatres in town. And we’ll still have the occasional review and festival coverage (SIFF has been cancelled this year but we still have hopes for VIFF). But as a regular source of coverage of what’s playing in the area every week, the site has been slowing down for a long time and it’s time to pull the plug.

On a more positive note, here’s this scene from Om Shanti Om (which played at the Beacon a couple weeks ago).

 

 

The Seattle Screen Scene Top 100 Films of All-Time Project

When the new Sight & Sound poll came out in 2012, Mike and I each came up with hypothetical Top Tens of our own. For the next few years, we came up with an entirely new Top Ten on our podcast, The George Sanders Show, every year around Labor Day. The podcast has ended, but the project continues here at Seattle Screen Scene.

The idea is that we keep doing this until the next poll comes out in 2022, by which time we’ll each have a Top 100 list. Well, I will. Mike will have only 98 because he repeated two from his 2012 list on the 2013 one.

Here are Mike’s Top Ten Films of All-Time for 2020:

To-Be-or-Not-to-Be

1. To Be or Not to Be (Ernst Lubitsch, 1942)

tokyostory

2. Tokyo Story (Yasujirō Ozu, 1953)

5000fingers

3. The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T (Roy Rowland, 1953)

shree-420

4. Shree 420 (Raj Kapoor, 1955)

aguirre

5. Aguirre, the Wrath of God (Werner Herzog, 1972)

monty-python-and-the-holy-grail

6. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam, 1975)

raging bull

7. Raging Bull (Martin Scorsese, 1980)

om_shanti_om

8. Om Shanti Om (Farah Khan, 2007)

thelimitsofcontrolmoviestil

9. The Limits of Control (Jim Jarmusch, 2009)

Master

10. The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012)

And here are Sean’s Top Ten Films of All-Time for 2020:

1. The Philadelphia Story (George Cukor, 1940)

2. Mughal-e-azam (K. Asif, 1960)

3. Yearning (Naruse Mikio, 1964)

4. It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown (Bill Melendez, 1966)

5. Night of the Living Dead (George Romero, 1968)

6. The Terrorizers (Edward Yang, 1986)

7. Om Shanti Om (Farah Khan, 2007)

8. Dusty Stacks of Mom (Jodie Mack, 2013)

9. The Midnight After (Fruit Chan, 2014)

10. Liz and the Blue Bird (Yamada Naoko, 2018)

Beau Travail (Claire Denis, 1999)

Criterion’s new 4K restoration of Claire Denis’ remarkable 1999 film looks absolutely gorgeous—stark, luminous, vividly colorful, and precise in every fine line and minute detail. That precision suits the film’s subject: a tightly disciplined French Foreign Legion troop under the demanding leadership of an obsessive sergeant. A loose adaptation of Herman Melville’s Billy Budd and a quasi-sequel to Jean-Luc Godard’s Le Petit Soldat (1960), the film tracks the gradual psychological unraveling of Chief Master Sergeant Galoup as he develops a jealous fixation on a new recruit, Gilles Sentain, whose beautiful face and ineffable cool make him a favorite both with the other legionnaires and with Galoup’s superior, Commander Forestier. Envy, repressed desire, and festering rage commingle in Galoup’s deteriorating mind, and the innocent Sentain suffers for it. As the film proceeds, we are inexorably drawn into the inevitable tragedy of their story, even as we revel in the startling beauty of Denis’ extraordinary vision.

Continue reading Beau Travail (Claire Denis, 1999)”

First Cow (dir. Kelly Reichardt, 2019)

first-cow-movie-review-2020

Kelly Reichardt’s latest film is, in most ways, of a piece with her previous films. Quiet in tone and measured in pacing, First Cow continues Reichardt’s sympathetic and observant explorations of the lives of outsiders and people on the margins. Like the settler women of Meek’s Cutoff and the homeless drifter of Wendy and Lucy, First Cow’s protagonists don’t have meaningful control of their destinies, despite their efforts to lift themselves out of their assigned places in the social and economic order. And like the radical environmentalists of Night Moves, First Cow’s protagonists aren’t above breaking laws in pursuit of their aims. First Cow, however, is perhaps the first Reichardt film that combines her keen-eyed artistry with genuine entertainment. Less grim than Wendy and Lucy, less cynical than Night Moves, more accessible than Meek’s Cutoff, and more tightly plotted than Certain Women, First Cow is an engrossing, engaging study of life in early nineteenth-century Oregon and two of its unlucky but ambitious inhabitants. Adapted from a novel by longtime Reichardt collaborator Jonathan Raymond, it has the rhythms of a folktale—and the lessons of one—detailing what might happen when clever, resourceful striving tips over into dangerous hubris.

Continue reading First Cow (dir. Kelly Reichardt, 2019)”

Sound! Euphonium: The Movie – Our Promise: A Brand New Day (Ishihara Tatsuya, 2019)

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Liz and the Blue Bird was one of the great films of 2018. A spin-off of the slice of life anime series Sound! Euphonium, it focused exclusively on two of the show’s supporting characters, digging into their psychology and relationship as the band prepared the eponymous performance piece for a competition. It’s the strongest work yet by Yamada Naoko, one of the guiding directorial voices of the Kyoto Animation studio that was devastated last year by a deadly arson attack. This new movie, originally released here for one single show last summer but now playing at the Grand Illusion as one of their virtual cinema offerings, is not like Liz and the Blue Bird at all. Instead it is a direct extension of the series, picking up right where it left off, following the same primary characters over the next school year, but squeezed into a hundred minutes rather than patiently unfolding over the course of two dozen episodes.

It’s a curious decision, one that skims over the things that made the show so great, the small moments of human connection realized through the playing of music, in favor of a whole lot of teen melodrama plotting, mostly among new characters that we don’t much care about. The Sound! Euphonium series, like any slice of life story, anime or otherwise, is about detail, the accumulation of small, everyday moments that in the aggregate coalesce into a kind of epiphany or catharsis that can be overwhelmingly emotional. This effect isn’t unique to anime or dependent on the extended length of a TV series, by the way, two of my favorite films from last year’s VIFF, Mikhaël Hers’s Amanda and Dan Sallitt’s Fourteen (which will be getting a virtual release in the next few weeks) achieve the same kind of epiphanies in much the same way, in running times of less than two hours. A Brand New Day picks up where Sound! Euphonium left off, with the show’s main character Kumiko, a euphonium player in her high school’s concert band, moving to her onto second year. The movie follows the whole year, from the initial meeting with the incoming freshman, several of whom will have interpersonal problems which Kumiko will end up helping to solve (in keeping with the structure of the series), and culminating in the band’s performance at the regional finals, where they hope to earn a spot at the national competition.

Everything about the movie is consistent with the original series. The show’s director, Ishihara Tatsuya, is in charge, and he keeps the visual style exactly the same, where in Liz and the Blue Bird, Yamada had slightly altered it, elongating the characters and muting the color palette to give the film a somewhat less cartoonishly anime appearance. The show is structured around a series of little interpersonal mysteries where Kumiko finds herself in the position of needing to figure out why Girl A is upset at Girl B so that they can both play better and the band can improve. This works in the series not because of the stories (which are mostly generic and not all that interesting) but because they merely form the structure around which hang smaller moments of beauty and because each little story ends up illuminating some aspect of Kumiko, a character who is revealed (to herself as much as to us) only through her interactions with other people and, perhaps more so, through the music she plays. A Brand New Day still does that, but because the stories are all so compressed, they have no weight. Moments that would have been incredibly powerful in the series (Kumiko’s tentative relationship with the trombone-playing boy next door Shuichi, and her much more romantic one with star trumpeter Reina are the highlights) move by too quickly, and would be all but incomprehensible to anyone who hasn’t seen the series. By the end of the movie, Kumiko doesn’t seem to be all that different from when it began.

The film’s highlight, in fact, is the final concert, which is also its only extended musical sequence. And its power comes not through any of the characters we’ve focused on for the previous hour and a half, but rather in the oboe solo that was the primary focus of Liz and the Blue BirdLiz takes place somewhere in the middle of the school year depicted in A Brand New Day, and while we see the shy but brilliant oboist Mizore in the background a few times, she doesn’t, as far as I could tell, have a single line (just as Kumiko and the series’ other primary characters were sidelined in Liz). The concert in fact doesn’t feel like the accumulation of Kumiko’s story at all, or any of the other primary characters from the movie. It’s the epilogue to Mizore’s story, the only one from this school year that really seems to matter.

Friday March 13 – Thursday March 19

Sonia Braga as Domingas - Victor Jucá
Featured Film:

Bacurau at the SIFF Uptown

Things are changing fast around Seattle as theatres decide whether or not to remain open, or remain partially open, or just close altogether. The Grand Illusion is closed until April beginning on Friday, as are the Seattle Art Museum’s film programs, but more are sure to follow if (when) things get worse. We encourage you to support your local theatres by buying gift cards if you’re able to. Independent movie theatres operate on a slim margin to begin with, so this pandemic could mean serious trouble. We have a lot of great independent theatres here (the Grand Illusion, The Northwest Film Forum, The Beacon, The Ark Lodge, etc) and it would be a disaster for the community were we to lose any of them.

Edit: And now (Friday afternoon) SIFF has announced that all three of its theatres (the Egyptian, the Uptown and the SIFF Film Center) are closed as well and will remain so for the foreseeable future. And the Grand Cinema will be closed but for a handful of special shows for at least the next two weeks.
On Saturday the Northwest Film Forum announced that they too were closing. The various chains and other theatres are all upping their theatre cleaning procedures and most are reducing to 50% capacity to help with social distancing.
And now (Monday) the Beacon, the Ark Lodge, the Central Cinema, all Faraway Entertainment Theatres (The Admiral, the Varsity, etc) and all Regal Cinemas are closed as well.
As of Tuesday morning, AMC, Landmark, and Cinemark have closed as well. So that’s it. There will be no Seattle Screen Scene for the foreseeable future.

I Was at Home, But… (Angela Schanelec, 2019)

family

The German director Angela Schanelec has had, with the exception of Ryusuke Hamaguchi, the most circuitous path to arthouse prominence of any director in the past decade. As part of the loose collective known as the Berlin School, which has produced some of the most interesting and skilled directors working today (Maren Ade, Christian Petzold, Ulrich Köhler), Schanelec has struck her own path, pursuing a more elliptical and rigorous approach to narrative and filmmaking than her peers. Correspondingly, she has had a low profile for a director of her stature, making six features before her breakout in 2016 with The Dreamed Path, perhaps her most narratively complex and productively opaque work yet.

Her follow-up, I Was at Home, But… takes a more “conventional” and discernible approach, but in doing so accesses both the emotional and the inexplicable, taking detours and narrative strands while burrowing deep into its central character. That person is Astrid, a single mother, played by regular Schanelec actor Maren Eggert, living in Berlin; the film begins just after her teenage son has returned from running away for undisclosed reasons. In essence, the film deals more or less solely with her, her son’s, and her young daughter’s daily lives after this brief rupture, and yet all attempts at simplification are nigh pointless. For one, there are significant corollary threads: a teacher (the ascendant Franz Rogowski) at the son’s school embarking on a tentative romance with one of his colleagues; Astrid’s relationship with her lover; the ongoing, particularly uninflected rehearsal of a translation of Hamlet. Overshadowing all of this is the death of Astrid’s partner some years before, a crucial piece of narrative information that, like most else in the film, is only parceled out slowly, communicated strongest in the loveliest detour: a brief montage of dance and nature scored to an acoustic cover of David Bowie’s “Let’s Dance.”

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One of the most peculiar and gratifying qualities of Schanelec’s film is her ability to draw these disparate moments into an ever-shifting whole, capturing the unsettled but quietly fortified existence of these characters. It’s difficult, for instance, to exactly settle on the tone of many scenes: the petulance of Astrid as she tries to hash out the status of the bike she bought from a man who speaks via a tinny electro-larynx is both maddening and truthful, just as the acting of the schoolchildren is both stilted and affecting. This applies in the interweaving of scenes as well: there are as many “random” moments introduced and dropped as there are narrative throughlines, and the viewer is left to determine the relative import of each for themselves in the course of the film, extending to the bookends, which feature a donkey, a dog, and a rabbit in the forest.

Of course, none of these are ultimately random or tossed-off; I Was at Home, But… is too intelligent for deliberate sabotage, something evident in the visual scheme, which typically foregoes the Bressonian close-ups of The Dreamed Path for long shots and long takes, the better to capture the full range of motion that the actors possess. This is captured in the film’s signal scene, a ten-minute tracking shot that follows Astrid and a filmmaker friend of hers (played by filmmaker Dane Komljen) as she lambasts his film for featuring an actor and a real sick person alongside each other. Where Schanelec ultimately falls on this spectrum is unresolved, but one of the lines that the filmmaker feels pertinent: “When you’re working on a film with other people, then it does become important how the work affects those people. What it means to them.” Affect and meaning go hand in hand, mysterious processes that nevertheless carry a personal truth that, in the right hands, can be overwhelming.

Friday March 6 – Thursday March 12

SLUMBER-PARTY-MASSACRE-01-1450x878
Featured Film:

Slumber Party Massacre at the Beacon Cinema

I’m not someone who grew up on horror movies; I’m an 80s kid who basically missed the entire slasher film era when it was happening. So for the last couple of Halloweens I’ve been trying to catch up with the classics I didn’t see when I was young. This past year my favorite was Amy Holden Jones’s Slumber Party Massacre, at once a exceptionally well-made suspense thriller and engrossing hang out film, a pointed feminist critique of and tribute to the slasher genre. The Beacon is playing it this Friday night as part of their excellent Haunted Light horror film series. And next week they’ve got another of the ones I watched last Halloween, Sleepaway Camp, a bold, and arguably quite offensive, film that’s surely one of the strangest and most unsettling movies of the 1980s.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Seberg (Benedict Andrews) Fri-Thurs 
Baaghi 3 (Ahmed Khan) Fri-Thurs 

The Beacon Cinema:

Valerie and Her Week of Wonders (Jaromir Jireš, 1970) Fri-Sun 
Slumber Party Massacre (Amy Holden Jones, 1982) Fri Only 
Aparajito (Satyajit Ray, 1956) Sat, Mon, & Tues 
Brewster McCloud (Robert Altman, 1970) Sat & Sun Only 
Shaolin Temple (Chang Cheh, 1976) Sat Only Our Review
Leda – The Fantastic Adventures of Yohko (Yuyama Kunihiko, 1985) Sun Only 
Prison on Fire (Ringo Lam, 1987) Mon & Weds Only Our Review 
Riki-Oh: The Story of Riki (Lam Nai-choi, 1991) Tues & Thurs Only 
The World of Apu (Satyajit Ray, 1959) Weds & Thurs Only 

Central Cinema:

The Wizard of Oz (Victor Fleming, 1939) Fri-Weds 
Wild at Heart (David Lynch, 1990) Fri-Weds 
Contagion (Steven Soderbergh, 2011) Thurs Only 

Century Federal Way:

My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising (Kenji Nagasaki) Fri-Thurs Dubbed or Subtitled, Check Listings
You Beautify My Life (Yan Qingxu & Yu De’an) Fri-Thurs 
Ik Sandhu Hunda Si (Rakesh Mehta) Fri-Thurs 

Grand Cinema:

Wendy (Benh Zeitlin) Fri-Thurs 
Cat Video Fest 2020 Fri-Thurs 
63 Up (Michael Apted) Tues Only 

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Come and See (Elem Klimov, 1985) Fri-Sun, Tues & Thurs 
Run this Town (Ricky Tollman) Fri-Sun, Mon & Weds 
Saturday Secret Matinees Sat Only 
Same God (Linda Midgett) Sun Only 

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Burden (Andrew Heckler) Fri-Thurs 
Baaghi 3 (Ahmed Khan) Fri-Thurs 
My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising (Kenji Nagasaki) Fri-Thurs Dubbed or Subtitled, Check Listings
Wendy (Benh Zeitlin) Fri-Thurs 
Gypsy (Raju Murugan) Fri-Thurs 
HIT (Sailesh Kolanu) Fri-Thurs 
Kannum Kannum Kollaiyadithaal (Desingh Periyasamy) Fri-Thurs 
Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan (Hitesh Kewalya) Fri-Thurs 
Thappad (Anubhav Sinha) Fri-Thurs 
Mayabazar 2016 (Radhakrishna Reddy) Fri-Thurs 
Trance (Anwar Rasheed) Fri-Sun 
Forensic (Anas Khan & Akhil Paul) Sat & Sun Only 

Regal Meridian:

Baaghi 3 (Ahmed Khan) Fri-Thurs 
Mayabazar 2016 (Radhakrishna Reddy) Fri-Thurs 
My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising (Kenji Nagasaki) Fri-Thurs Dubbed or Subtitled, Check Listings
Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band (Daniel Roher) Fri-Thurs 
Ordinary Love (Lisa Barros D’Sa) Fri-Thurs 
Tokyo Godfathers (Kon Satoshi, 2003) Mon & Weds Only Subtitled Monday

Northwest Film Forum:

Children’s Film Festival 2020 Fri-Sun  Full Program
Flamenco Syndrome (Bijoyini Chatterjee) Sun Only 
The Hidden People of the Shadowy Rocks (Róska & Manrico Povolettino, 1982) Sun Only 
I Was at Home, But. . . (Angela Schanelec) Weds, Thurs & Next Sat & Sun Only Our Review 
The Howling (Joe Dante, 1981) Thurs Only 

AMC Oak Tree:

Wendy (Benh Zeitlin) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Pacific Place:

Burden (Andrew Heckler) Fri-Thurs 
Baaghi 3 (Ahmed Khan) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Baaghi 3 (Ahmed Khan) Fri-Thurs 

Seattle Art Museum:

A Tale of Summer (Eric Rohmer, 1996) Thurs Only 

AMC Seattle:

Seberg (Benedict Andrews) Fri-Thurs 
Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band (Daniel Roher) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Film Center:

Premature (Rashaad Ernesto Green) Fri-Sun 

AMC Southcenter:

My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising (Kenji Nagasaki) Fri-Thurs 
Beneath Us (Max Pachman) Fri-Thurs 
Las Pildoras de Mi Novio (Diego Kaplan) Fri-Thurs In Spanish with No Subtitles

Regal Thornton Place:

My Hero Academia: Heroes Rising (Kenji Nagasaki) Fri-Thurs Dubbed or Subtitled, Check Listings
Seberg (Benedict Andrews) Fri-Thurs 
Tokyo Godfathers (Kon Satoshi, 2003) Mon & Weds Only Subtitled Monday

SIFF Uptown:

Wendy (Benh Zeitlin) Fri-Thurs 
The Traitor (Marco Bellocchio) Fri-Thurs 

Varsity Theatre:

Weathering with You (Shinkai Makoto) Fri-Thurs Subtitled or Dubbed, Check Listings
Becoming (Omar Naim) Fri-Thurs 
Final Kill (Justin Lee) Fri-Thurs 

In Wide Release:

The Rise of Skywalker (JJ Abrams) Our Review 
Little Women (Greta Gerwig) Our Review
Parasite (Bong Joonho) Our Review Our Podcast 

Friday February 28 – Thursday March 5

Vitalina-Varela-_2
Featured Film:

Vitalina Varela at the SIFF Film Center

Pedro Costa’s latest is another in his story of the Fontainhas, the Lisbon neighborhood of Cape Verdean immigrants, following In Vanda’s Room, Ossos, Colossal Youth and Horse Money. It’s about a woman who is finally able to fly to Lisbon to see her husband, but arrives shortly after his funeral. I haven’t seen it yet, but Evan caught it at the Toronto Film Festival last year at wrote about it at The Georgia Straight. He was mixed on the film, but noted that Costa’s “images are as striking as any in contemporary cinema; they are incredible things to witness on a movie screen”.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Seberg (Benedict Andrews) Fri-Thurs 
Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan (Hitesh Kewalya) Fri-Thurs 

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

The Woman who Loves Giraffes (Alison Reid) Fri-Thurs 

The Beacon Cinema:

Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1975) Fri & Sat Only 
Day of the Dead (George Romero, 1985) Fri Only 
Pather Panchali (Satyajit Ray, 1955) Sat, Sun, Tues & Thurs 
The Harder They Come (Perry Henzell, 1972) Sat-Mon 
The Church (Michele Soavi, 1989) Sat Only Pre-movie Live Set from Mortiferum
Megazone 23 (Ishiguro Noboru, 1985) Sun Only 
Zodiac (David Fincher, 2007) Sun, Mon & Weds Director’s Cut
Penitentiary (Jamaa Fanaka, 1979) Tues & Thurs Only 
The Zodiac Killer (Tom Hanson, 1971) Weds Only 

Central Cinema:

The Last Starfighter (Nick Castle, 1984) Fri-Tues 
Ghost in the Shell (Mamoru Oshii, 1995) Fri-Weds 

Century Federal Way:

Ik Sandhu Hunda Si (Rakesh Mehta) Fri-Thurs 
Sufna (Jagdeep Sidhu) Fri-Thurs 

Grand Cinema:

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma) Fri-Thurs 
Beanpole (Kantemir Balagov) Fri-Thurs 
The Assistant (Kitty Green) Fri-Thurs 
Cat Video Fest 2020 Fri-Thurs 
Tales from the Hood (Rusty Cundieff, 1995) Sat Only 
Recorder: the Marion Stokes Project (Matt Wolf) Tues Only 

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Olympic Dreams (Jeremy Teicher) Fri-Thurs 
Saturday Secret Matinees Sat Only 

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Seberg (Benedict Andrews) Fri-Thurs 
Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma) Fri-Thurs 
Doordarshan (Gagan Puri) Fri-Thurs 
HIT (Sailesh Kolanu) Fri-Thurs 
Kannum Kannum Kollaiyadithaal (Desingh Periyasamy) Fri-Thurs 
Thappad (Anubhav Sinha) Fri-Thurs 
Bheeshma (Venky Kudumula) Fri-Thurs 
Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan (Hitesh Kewalya) Fri-Thurs 
Forensic (Anas Khan & Akhil Paul) Sat & Sun Only 

Regal Meridian:

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma) Fri-Thurs 
Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band (Daniel Roher) Fri-Thurs 
Ordinary Love (Lisa Barros D’Sa) Fri-Thurs 

Northwest Film Forum:

Children’s Film Festival 2020 Starts Thurs  Full Program
The 3rd Seattle BPP Film Festival featuring Mama C Weds & Thurs Only  

AMC Oak Tree:

Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band (Daniel Roher) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Pacific Place:

Seberg (Benedict Andrews) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan (Hitesh Kewalya) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Seattle:

Seberg (Benedict Andrews) Fri-Thurs 
Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band (Daniel Roher) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Film Center:

Vitalina Varela (Pedro Costa) Fri-Sun
Election (Alexander Payne, 1999) Weds Only 

AMC Southcenter:

Las Pildoras de Mi Novio (Diego Kaplan) Fri-Thurs In Spanish with No Subtitles

Regal Thornton Place:

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma) Fri-Thurs 
Seberg (Benedict Andrews) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Uptown:

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma) Fri-Thurs 
63 Up (Michael Apted) Fri-Thurs 
Nordic Lights Film Festival Fri-Sun Full Program 
The Adventures of Prince Achmed (Lotte Reiniger, 1926) Sat Only 

Varsity Theatre:

Weathering with You (Shinkai Makoto) Fri-Thurs Subtitled or Dubbed, Check Listings

In Wide Release:

The Rise of Skywalker (JJ Abrams) Our Review 
Little Women (Greta Gerwig) Our Review
Parasite (Bong Joonho) Our Review Our Podcast 

Friday February 21 – Thursday February 27

celine-julie-1400x788
Featured Film:

Celine and Julie and Susan at the Beacon Cinema

The Beacon this week has Jacques Rivette’s masterpiece Celine and Julie Go Boating, about two French women who meet and become friends and with the help of a magic candy become witnesses to, and ultimately deconstructors of, a Henry James-ish melodrama. They’ve paired it with a film it inspired, Susan Seidelman’s classic Desperately Seeking Susan, along with another 80s film that has a similar screwball energy, Jonathan Demme’s Something Wild. But if a more classic screwball is your thing, check out the SIFF Film Center on Saturday, where our pal Kathy Fennessy is dissecting Howard Hawks’s His Girl Friday. Or if you want a wholly different Celine entirely, the Egyptian and the Lincoln Square have the long-awaited release of Céline Sciamma’s Portrait of a Lady on Fire.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan (Hitesh Kewalya) Fri-Thurs 

The Beacon Cinema:

Celine and Julie Go Boating (Jacques Rivette, 1974) Fri-Sun, Thurs 
Shock Waves (Ken Wiederhorn, 1977) Fri Only 
Journey Into a Burning Brain: A Tangerine Dream Mystery Triple Feature Sat Only 
Project A-Ko (Katsuhiko Nishijima, 1986) Sun Only 
Brokeback Mountain (Ang Lee, 2005) Sun Only 
Desperately Seeking Susan (Susan Seildelman, 1985) Mon, Tues & Thurs Only 
Something Wild (Jonathan Demme, 1986) Mon, Tues & Weds Only 
Gaza Fights for Freedom (Abby Martin) Weds Only 

Central Cinema:

Bring It On (Peyton Reed, 2000) Fri-Weds 
Attack the Block (Joe Cornish, 2011) Fri-Weds 

SIFF Egyptian:

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma) Fri-Thurs 

Century Federal Way:

Sufna (Jagdeep Sidhu) Fri-Thurs 
The Color Purple (Steven Spielberg, 1985) Sun Only 

Grand Cinema:

The Assistant (Kitty Green) Fri-Thurs 
Night of the Living Dead (George Romero, 1968) Sat Only 
Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash, 1991) Tues Only 

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Goldie (Sam de Jong) Fri-Thurs  
Saturday Secret Matinees Sat Only 
Olympic Dreams (Jeremy Teicher) Sat-Thurs 

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Céline Sciamma) Fri-Thurs 
Love Aaj Kal (Imtiaz Ali) Fri-Thurs 
Bheeshma (Venky Kudumula) Fri-Thurs 
Bhoot – Part One: The Haunted Ship (Bhanu Pratap Singh) Fri-Thurs 
Mafia – Chapter 1 (Karthick Naren) Fri-Thurs 
Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan (Hitesh Kewalya) Fri-Thurs 
The Color Purple (Steven Spielberg, 1985) Sun Only 

Northwest Film Forum:

Nikolaus Geyrhalter’s Earth (Nikolaus Geyrhalter) Sun Only  
We Believe in Dinosaurs (Monica Long Ross & Clayton Brown) Sun Only  
Heedless into Night (Nifemi Madarikan) Weds Only  
Children’s Film Festival 2020 Starts Thurs  Full Program

AMC Pacific Place:

The Assistant (Kitty Green) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan (Hitesh Kewalya) Fri-Thurs 

Seattle Art Museum:

Boyfriends and Girlfriends (Eric Rohmer, 1987) Thurs Only 

SIFF Film Center:

The Cordillera of Dreams (Patricio Guzmán) Fri-Sun
His Girl Friday (Howard Hawks, 1940) Sat Only Dissection with Kathy Fennessy 

AMC Southcenter:

Las Pildoras de Mi Novio (Diego Kaplan) Fri-Thurs In Spanish with No Subtitles

Regal Thornton Place:

The Color Purple (Steven Spielberg, 1985) Sun Only 

SIFF Uptown:

Corpus Christi (Jan Komasa) Fri-Thurs 
63 Up (Michael Apted) Fri-Thurs 
Cat Video Fest 2020 Sat & Sun Only

Varsity Theatre:

Weathering with You (Shinkai Makoto) Fri-Thurs Subtitled or Dubbed, Check Listings
Standing Up, Falling Down (Matt Ratner) Fri-Thurs 
Manou the Swift (Andrea Block & Christian Haas) Fri-Thurs 
The Color Purple (Steven Spielberg, 1985) Sun Only 

In Wide Release:

The Rise of Skywalker (JJ Abrams) Our Review 
Little Women (Greta Gerwig) Our Review
Parasite (Bong Joonho) Our Review Our Podcast