Friday August 10 – Thursday August 16

Featured Film:

8 Diagram Pole Fighter at the Grand Illusion

One of the Grand Illusion’s best traditions is back this week, a 35mm martial arts classic double feature courtesy of Portland’s Dan Halsted, playing Saturday night only. The headliner is Lau Kar-leung’s 8 Diagram Pole Fighter, with Gordon Liu as the lone (sane) survivor of an attack on a famed family of generals, who goes into hiding at a monastery and eventually seeks his revenge. It’s probably Lau’s darkest film, The Searchers of kung fu movies. Paired with it is a mystery film, also on 35mm, which is certain to be something worth watching.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Along with the Gods: The Last 49 Days (Kim Yonghwa) Fri-Thurs

Central Cinema:

Wayne’s World (Penelope Spheeris, 1992) Fri-Tues
Madonna: Truth or Dare (Alek Keshishian, 1991) Fri-Tues

Century Federal Way:

Along with the Gods: The Last 49 Days (Kim Yonghwa) Fri-Thurs
Dakuaan Da Munda (Mandeep Benipal) Fri-Thurs
Grave of the Fireflies (Isao Takahata, 1988) Sun, Mon & Weds Only Subtitled Monday

Grand Cinema:

You Were Never Really Here (Lynne Ramsay) Sat Only Our Review
Zoo (Colin McIver) Tues Only
The Wizard of Oz (Victor Fleming, 1939) Weds Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Nico, 1988 (Susanna Nicchiarelli) Fri-Thurs
Maquia: When the Promised Flower Blooms (Mari Okada) Sat & Sun Only
8 Diagram Pole Fighter (Lau Kar-leung, 1984) Sat Only 35mm, Plus Secret Bonus Feature Our Review Our Podcast
Our House (Anthony Scott Burns) Fri, Sun, Tues & Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Vishwaroopam 2 (Kamal Haasan) Fri-Thurs In Tamil, Telugu or Hindi, Check Listings
Goodachari (Sashi Kiran Tikka) Fri-Thurs
Srinivasa Kalyanam (Satish Vegesna) Fri-Thurs
Pushpak Viman (Subodh Bhave & Vaibhav Chinchalkar) Sat & Sun Only
Grave of the Fireflies (Isao Takahata, 1988) Sun, Mon & Weds Only Subtitled Monday
Cowboy Bebop: The Movie (Shinichirō Watanabe, 2001) Weds & Thurs Only

Regal Meridian:

The Island (Huang Bo) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Northwest Film Forum:

That Summer (Göran Olsson) Fri-Sun
Finda Christa (Camille Billops) Sat Only 16mm
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Film Forum Sun Only
Chicagoland Shorts Vol. 4 Sun Only
Fight Fam Weds Only Q&A After, Free Event
Milford Graves Full Mantis (Jake Meginsky) Weds & Thurs Only

AMC Oak Tree:

The Island (Huang Bo) Fri-Thurs Our Review

AMC Pacific Place:

McQueen (Ian Bonhôte & Peter Ettedgui) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Buybust (Erik Matti) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

To Be or Not To Be (Ernst Lubitsch, 1942) Thurs Only

SIFF Film Center:

Araby (Affonso Uchôa & João Dumans) Fri-Sun

Regal Thornton Place:

Grave of the Fireflies (Isao Takahata, 1988) Sun, Mon & Weds Only Subtitled Monday
Cowboy Bebop: The Movie (Shinichirō Watanabe, 2001) Weds & Thurs Only

SIFF Uptown:

The Miseducation of Cameron Post (Desiree Akhavan) Fri-Thurs

Varsity Theatre:

Grave of the Fireflies (Isao Takahata, 1988) Weds Only

In Wide Release:

Mission: Impossible–Fallout (Christopher McQuarrie) Our Review
Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham) Our Review
Ant-Man and the Wasp (Peyton Reed) Our Review
Ocean’s 8 (Gary Ross) Our Review
Solo (Ron Howard) Our Review
Avengers: Infinity War (Anthony & Joe Russo) Our Review
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The Island (Huang Bo, 2018)

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Opening this week at the Oak Tree (which in itself is interesting, as recent Chinese releases have almost exclusively played downtown at the Pacific Place or the Meridian), is the directorial debut of Huang Bo, a comic actor probably best known for playing the Monkey King in Stephen Chow’s Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons. In The Island, he’s reunited with one of his co-stars from that film, Shu Qi, for a fascinating film that’s half adventure/rom-com and half allegory about the different stages of socio-economic evolution.

Huang and his co-workers, thirty of them in all, counting their boss, go off on a team-building trip in one of those buses that go on the water (you know, the ones with a duck face on the front), out of the local harbor and into the ocean. Unfortunately for them, a massive meteor is headed for that very same ocean, which creates a tidal wave that deposits them all on a deserted island, at the very same moment that Huang learns he has won the lottery.

What follows are the usual escapades, familiar from Gilligan’s Island and Lord of the Flies, but structuring it all are the different phases of leadership and economy the survivors follow. Initially, it is sheer physical strength and dexterity that determines power, with the bus driver (played by Detective Chinatown‘s Wang Baoqiang) assuming tyrannical powers because he’s the only one of them able to climb the trees necessary to retrieve fruit. Soon though the society is split, with the (former) boss promising more freedom for his followers, only to essentially enslave them in a wage-labor and currency system, which he manipulates for his own benefit.

The boss is able to get his start because he discovers an old shipwreck full of essential supplies, basically he lucks into an enormous stockpile of capital. The same thing eventually happens to Huang, which he uses to assert his own control, with even more fanciful promises of freedom, this time based on a kind of communitarianism. This too, though will be corrupted by lies and greed, leaving the workers desperate.

What happens next, after feudalism, capitalism, and socialism, is up in the air, and Huang’s vision of a future outside of these systems is slippery at best, essentially fanciful and inevitably tied up with his character’s obsession with Shu Qi, the co-worker he’s had a crush on for years. Over time, she begins to warm up to him, and her faith in his decency forces him ultimately to confront his own corruption.

But despite Shu Qi’s ever-present charm, she isn’t much of a person, serving instead only as a foil or object of desire for the hero. None of the islanders are any more than types, really, which I suppose is the danger of making a film that is driven more by theory than relationships or individuality. Despite that, The Island is fascinating, defying analogy (maybe a materialist Lost? . . .) while being both funny and surprising in its narrative twists and in its ultimate ambivalence towards, well, everything. People, society, economics, religion, fate, politics and so on. A singular work, one not to be missed.

Dark Money (Kimberly Reed, 2018)

Dark Money - Still 1

As the opening credits come up on Kimberly Reed’s powerful new documentary, we see shots of the remarkable beauty of the natural landscape of Montana juxtaposed with startling images of the human and environmental devastation produced by mining and petroleum companies’ aggressive and essentially unregulated extraction practices. Reed here shows us in microcosm what we stand to lose as a nation if corporate and industrial power is left unchecked. Juxtapositions like this form the structure of the film that ensues, which alternates between the hopeful and the deeply discouraging as Reed pursues her thesis: Untraceable “dark money” political campaign contributions and the corruption that they foster constitute a grave threat to American democracy. A documentary on this subject, while essential, could easily become a tedious screed, of interest only to policy wonks and activists. Reed, however, finds the humanity and the drama in her subject, creating a clear, compelling, and surprisingly even-handed case that citizen vigilance is more important now than it has been in decades.

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Wanda (1970, Barbara Loden)

wanda

What does it mean to say that a film is, in whole or in part, about America or, indeed, “America”? Perhaps more than most mediums, cinema has provided a whole range of examples and styles from which to draw from and examine; to name just a few wildly disparate examples: The Searchers, Dogville, Paris, Texas. This tendency, of course, should be distinguished from films that are about a specific aspect of American life, culture, or society: films like Rio Bravo or Trust, while expansive in their own way, don’t appear to attempt to dissect the idea of America.

What does distinguish a film about America is a certain sense of scope, or a focus upon a part of America that is at once universal within the land and (usually) concentrated to a certain milieu. The film in question doesn’t need to announce itself as attempting this task; rather, it (by necessity) almost always emerges organically out of the visual and thematic fabric of the film.

One such example of this phenomenon is Wanda, the sole feature film written and directed by Barbara Loden, otherwise known as a theatrical and movie actress, frequently for Elia Kazan. In narrative terms, it is a deceptively simple film: Wanda (played by Loden herself) is a woman living in impoverished circumstances in the coal mining regions of eastern Pennsylvania. Near the beginning of the film, she divorces her husband, acquiescing with a startling lack of resistance – one of her key traits throughout the film – to her now ex-husband’s wishes, willingly relinquishing her two young children. She then meets the tempestuous, tetchy petty criminal Mr. Dennis (Michael Higgins), who takes her away from the bar that he has just robbed. The rest of the film follows this odd, often abusive relationship, as they meander through the state until Mr. Dennis attempts to enact a half-baked bank robbery.

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Friday August 3 – Thursday August 9

Featured Film:

Wanda at the Northwest Film Forum

With August comes the truly dark days of the film year. There are a handful of bright spots this week: Demolition Man on 35mm at the Grand Illusion, Nothing Sacred at SAM, the continuing run of Detective Dee: The Four Heavenly Kings at the Pacific Place, as well as wide runs of Sorry to Bother You and blockbusters like Mission: Impossible–Fallout and Ant-Man and the Wasp. But if you can use you MoviePass* on only one movie this week (and you better use it while you can), don’t miss the Northwest Film Forum’s presentation of Barbara Loden’s Wanda, a legendarily forgotten film, an independent production mishandled on its initial release and revived only rarely since. With its restoration and rerelease, it’s now taking its canonical place as one of the great films of the New Hollywood era. It plays at the Film Forum Friday and Saturday only.

*Update: Looks like you can’t use MoviePass at the Film Forum at all. Apparently not since June. Regardless, Wanda is a film worth paying full price for.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Along with the Gods: The Last 49 Days (Kim Yonghwa) Fri-Thurs
Fanney Khan (Atul Manjrekar) Fri-Thurs

Central Cinema:

The Goonies (Richard Donner, 1985) Fri-Sun, Tues
Face/Off (John Woo, 1997) Weds Only Hecklevision

Century Federal Way:

Along with the Gods: The Last 49 Days (Kim Yonghwa) Fri-Thurs
The Big Lebowski (Joel & Ethan Coen, 1998) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Planet of the Apes (Franklin J. Schaffner, 1968) Sat Only
American Animals (Bart Layton) Tues Only
Yellow Submarine (George Dunning, 1968) Thurs Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Demolition Man (Marco Brambilla, 1993) Fri-Sun, Mon & Weds 35mm
Outland (Peter Hyams, 1981) Fri-Sun, Tues & Thurs
Filmworker (Tony Zierra) Sat-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Goodachari (Sashi Kiran Tikka) Fri-Thurs
Chi La Sow (Rahul Ravindran) Fri-Thurs
Fanney Khan (Atul Manjrekar) Fri-Thurs
Karwaan (Akarsh Khurana) Fri-Thurs
Mulk (Anubhav Sinha) Fri-Thurs
The Big Lebowski (Joel & Ethan Coen, 1998) Sun & Weds Only

Northwest Film Forum:

Wanda (Barbara Loden, 1970) Fri & Sat Only
The Other Side of Everything (Mila Turajlić) Fri-Sun
That Summer (Göran Olsson) Starts Weds

AMC Oak Tree:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review

AMC Pacific Place:

Detective Dee: The Four Heavenly Kings (Tsui Hark) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Gus Van Sant) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

Nothing Sacred (William Wellman, 1937) Thurs Only

SIFF Film Center:

Dark Money (Kimberly Reed) Sun-Thurs Our Review

Regal Thornton Place:

The Big Lebowski (Joel & Ethan Coen, 1998) Sun & Weds Only

SIFF Uptown:

Dark Money (Kimberly Reed) Fri-Sat Our Review
Generation Wealth (Lauren Greenfield) Fri-Thurs

Varsity Theatre:

The Catcher was a Spy (Ben Lewin) Fri-Thurs
The Big Lebowski (Joel & Ethan Coen, 1998) Weds Only

In Wide Release:

Mission: Impossible–Fallout (Christopher McQuarrie) Our Review
Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham) Our Review
Ant-Man and the Wasp (Peyton Reed) Our Review
Ocean’s 8 (Gary Ross) Our Review
Solo (Ron Howard) Our Review
Avengers: Infinity War (Anthony & Joe Russo) Our Review

Mission: Impossible – Fallout (2018, Christopher McQuarrie)

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Discussing the evolution of a blockbuster franchise series can sometimes be a difficult venture (that is, when it is worth dissecting). With some, it seems patently obvious: for example, Paul W.S. Anderson’s Resident Evil series developed over the course of its thirteen-year existence from straightforward, video-game inflected horror to totally artificial, digital constructions. Others are tied explicitly to commercial interests: the Marvel Cinematic Universe has remained resolutely within its narrative and formal wheelhouse even while it aims to present the veneer of change.

In this context, the Mission: Impossible films present a fairly unusual case. On the surface, it would seem to lack a single unifying creative voice, having switched out directors every single installment until the most recent two, with the motley crew of helmers counting in its club Brian De Palma, John Woo, J.J. Abrams, and Brad Bird. One could then turn to the man at its center: Tom Cruise, whose continual acceleration of his tendencies towards potential self-destruction in order to achieve maximum visceral thrills is unparalleled in the modern Hollywood cinema. But that still doesn’t account for the overall series, which has rarely (if ever) veered outside of excellence, a continuity of quality. Furthermore, the specific manifestation of this quality varies from film to film, and up to this point from director to director.

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Friday July 27 – Thursday August 2

Featured Film:

Detective Dee: The Four Heavenly Kings at the Pacific Place

Tsui Hark’s last couple of movies have been disappointing: the schizophrenic Demons Strike Back, the underwhelming Sword Master, and the just not very good Thousand Faces of Dunjia. But with Four Heavenly Kings he’s made his best movie since The Taking of Tiger Mountain. Mark Chao returns as the Tang Dynasty hero, once again protecting the Empire (and the kind of evil Empress Wu) from the forces of magic and superstition, embodied this time in a gang of magician/assassins from the underworld and a gang of even more lethal cultists from India. With some of the best and most imaginative special effects we’ve seen since Baahubali, it’s blockbuster filmmaking at its best. I wrote about it this week in my column at Mubi. Also, the Northwest Film Forum, in their continuing effort to redefine the movie week, launches their run of the new retsoration of Barbara Loden’s classic Wanda on Wednesday. It only plays for four days, until Saturday the 4th. Don’t miss it.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Central Cinema:

Aliens (James Cameron, 1986) Fri-Tues
Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (Joe Johnston, 1989) Fri-Weds

SIFF Egyptian:

Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Century Federal Way:

Soorma (Shaad Ali) Fri-Thurs
Ashke (Amberdeep Singh) Fri-Thurs
Across the Universe (Julie Taymor, 2007) Sun & Tues Only

Grand Cinema:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Theta Girl (Christopher Bickel) Sat Only
Half the Picture (Amy Adrion) Tues Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

To Live and Die in LA (William Friedkin, 1985) Fri-Sun, Mon & Weds 35mm
Ronin (John Frankenheimer, 1998) Fri-Sun, Tues & Thurs 35mm
Filmworker (Tony Zierra) Sat-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3 (Tigmanshu Dhulia) Fri-Thurs
Junga (Gokul) Fri-Thurs
Happy Wedding (Lakshman Karya) Fri-Thurs
Chumbak (Sandeep Modi) Sun Only
Across the Universe (Julie Taymor, 2007) Sun & Tues Only

Regal Meridian:

Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Across the Universe (Julie Taymor, 2007) Sun, Tues & Weds Only

Northwest Film Forum:

Saving Brinton (Tommy Haines & Andrew Sherburne) Sun Only
7 Splinters in Time (Gabriel Judet-Weinshel) Sun Only
Wanda (Barbara Loden, 1970) Weds-Sat
Italo Disco Legacy (Pietro Anton) Thurs Only

AMC Oak Tree:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review

AMC Pacific Place:

Detective Dee: The Four Heavenly Kings (Tsui Hark) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Gus Van Sant) Fri-Thurs

AMC Seattle:

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Gus Van Sant) Fri-Thurs
Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Seattle Art Museum:

True Confession (Wesley Ruggles, 1937) Thurs Only

SIFF Film Center:

Under the Tree (Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson) Fri-Sun

Regal Thornton Place:

Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Across the Universe (Julie Taymor, 2007) Sun, Tues & Weds Only

SIFF Uptown:

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Gus Van Sant) Fri-Thurs

Varsity Theatre:

The Catcher was a Spy (Ben Lewin) Fri-Tues

In Wide Release:

Mission: Impossible–Fallout (Christopher McQuarrie) Our Review
Ant-Man and the Wasp (Peyton Reed) Our Review
Ocean’s 8 (Gary Ross) Our Review
Solo (Ron Howard) Our Review
Avengers: Infinity War (Anthony & Joe Russo) Our Review

Eighth Grade (2018, Bo Burnham)

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In the course of writing evaluative pieces on film, a reviewer must always contend with their own biases related to form and content. This is by necessity, for if a critic tasks themselves with writing on movies that are “outside” their preferred aesthetic wheelhouse, then they will inevitably come across films that, try as they might, they cannot help but feel repulsed by. Of course, no film is made for everyone, and some films, even and especially those in the consciousness of mainstream culture, are hyper-specific in their catering to a specific audience. But there is a feeling of churlishness that can arise, one that exists on a level that exceeds a reaction that merely runs counter to a critical and cultural consensus.

I say all of this to give some context for my personal reaction to Eighth Grade, the directorial debut of YouTube personality Bo Burnham. As the title suggests, it covers the last week of the middle school tenure of Kayla (Elsie Fisher), an outwardly shy and quiet student who posts daily YouTube vlogs covering topics almost exclusively related to self-betterment. Through the course of these few days, she deals with a variety of awkward and sometimes intensely embarrassing social situations, all while contending with the various pressures and possibilities of modern social media.

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Friday July 20 – Thursday July 26

Featured Film:

Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure at the Ark Lodge

Sure, the Grand Illusion has 35mm prints of Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon and The Shining, but the Ark Lodge has a one showing only presentation (with free ice cream for the kids!) of one of the greatest movies of all-time, so they get our coveted Featured Film spot this week. Our love for Bill & Ted goes way back, as you can hear in this episode of The George Sanders Show. Be excellent to each other, and party on, dudes.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Dhadak (Shashank Khaitan) Fri-Thurs

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (Stephen Herek, 1989) Sat Only Our Podcast

Central Cinema:

Newsies (Kenny Ortega, 1992) Fri-Mon
The Apple (Menahem Golan, 1980) Fri-Tues

SIFF Egyptian:

Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham) Fri-Thurs

Century Federal Way:

Dhol Ratti (Shivam Sharma) Fri-Thurs
Princess Mononoke (Hayao Miyazaki, 1997) Sun, Mon & Weds Only Subtitled Monday
The Sandlot (David Mickey Evans, 1993) Sun & Tues Only

Grand Cinema:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Guardians (Xavier Beauvois) Fri-Thurs
Yellow Submarine (George Dunning, 1968) Sat & Mon Only
The Land Before Time (Don Bluth, 1988) Sat Only
Pink Flamingos (John Waters, 1972) Sat Only
Happy Birthday, Marsha (Reina Gossett & Sasha Wortzel) Mon Only Free Screening
Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami (Sophie Fiennes) Weds Only
Paper Tigers (James Redford) Thurs Only Free Screening

Grand Illusion Cinema:

The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980) Fri, Sun, Mon & Weds 35mm
Barry Lyndon (Norman Jewison, 1975) Sat, Sun, Tues & Thurs 35mm
Maquia: When the Promised Flower Blooms (Mari Okada) Sat-Mon

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham) Fri-Thurs
Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Gus Van Sant) Fri-Thurs
Dhadak (Shashank Khaitan) Fri-Thurs
Aatagadharaa Siva (Chandra Siddhartha) Fri-Thurs
Sanju (Rajkumar Hirani) Fri-Thurs
Lover (Annish Krishna) Fri-Thurs
Princess Mononoke (Hayao Miyazaki, 1997) Sun, Mon & Weds Only Subtitled Monday
The Sandlot (David Mickey Evans, 1993) Sun & Tues Only

Regal Meridian:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Maquia: When the Promised Flower Blooms (Mari Okada) Sat & Tues Only
The Sandlot (David Mickey Evans, 1993) Sun & Tues Only

Northwest Film Forum:

Sea to Shining Sea (Maximón Monihan) Mon Only Filmmakers in Attendance
Saving Brinton (Tommy Haines & Andrew Sherburne) Weds, Thurs & next Sun Only

AMC Oak Tree:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Sanju (Rajkumar Hirani) Fri-Thurs
American Animals (Bart Layton) Fri-Thurs

AMC Seattle:

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Gus Van Sant) Fri-Thurs
Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Seattle Art Museum:

My Man Godfrey (Gregory La Cava, 1936) Thurs Only

SIFF Film Center:

The Cakemaker (Ofir Raul Graizer) Fri-Thurs

Regal Thornton Place:

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Gus Van Sant) Fri-Thurs
Maquia: When the Promised Flower Blooms (Mari Okada) Sat & Tues Only
Princess Mononoke (Hayao Miyazaki, 1997) Sun, Mon & Weds Only
The Sandlot (David Mickey Evans, 1993) Sun & Tues Only

SIFF Uptown:

Yellow Submarine (George Dunning, 1968) Fri-Sun
Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Gus Van Sant) Fri-Thurs

Varsity Theatre:

Princess Mononoke (Hayao Miyazaki, 1997) Weds Only

In Wide Release:

Ant-Man and the Wasp (Peyton Reed) Our Review
Ocean’s 8 (Gary Ross) Our Review
Solo (Ron Howard) Our Review
Avengers: Infinity War (Anthony & Joe Russo) Our Review

Friday July 13 – Thursday July 19

Featured Film:

Actual Film at the Grand Illusion

This week the Grand Illusion kicks off a multi-week celebration of 35mm, with matched pairs of classic films from the 60s to the 90s. This first week features a pair of 50 year old Steve McQueen classics, the heist film The Thomas Crown Affair and the cop drama Bullitt, with its justly-celebrated car chase. Next week is a pair from Stanley Kubrick: The Shining and Barry Lyndon (which should be a must-see on film). Then two underrated crime classics from directors more famous for other movies: To Live and Die in LA from William Friedkin and Ronin by John Frankenheimer. The series concludes with the sci-fi films Outland, by Peter Hyams and Demolition Man, from Marco Brambilla. These days 35mm is almost wholly absent from Seattle Screens, and when we do get something it’s usually one of the same old titles that play again and again. Only the Grand Illusion is cool enough to give us a series with both Barry Lyndon and Demolition Man.

Playing This Week:

Admiral Theatre:

Big (Penny Marshall, 198) Weds Only

AMC Alderwood:

Sanju (Rajkumar Hirani) Fri-Thurs

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

The Goonies (Richard Donner, 1985) Sat Only Free Ice Cream for Kids
Scorchy (Howard Avedis, 1976) Thurs Only

Central Cinema:

Castle in the Sky (Hayao Miyazaki, 1986) Fri-Tues Subtitled Tues Only
Blade II (Guillermo del Toro, 2002) Fri-Tues

SIFF Egyptian:

Yellow Submarine (George Dunning, 1968) Fri-Thurs

Century Federal Way:

Vadhayiyaan Ji Vadhayiyaan (Smeep Kang) Fri-Thurs
Big (Penny Marshall, 198) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Hearts Beat Loud (Brett Haley) Fri-Thurs
Eating Animals (Christopher Dillon Quinn) Fri-Thurs
Hedwig and the Angry Inch (John Cameron Mitchell, 2001) Sat Only
Saturday Church (Damon Cardasis) Tues Only
Yellow Submarine (George Dunning, 1968) Weds Only
Local Produce: Short Films Weds Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Bullitt (Peter Yates, 1968) Fri-Sun, Tues & Thurs 35mm
The Thomas Crown Affair (Norman Jewison, 1968) Fri-Sun, Mon & Weds 35mm
En el séptimo día (Jim McKay) Sat-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Three Identical Strangers (Tim Wardle) Fri-Thurs
Kadaikutty Singam (Pandiraj) Fri-Thurs In Tamil or Telugu, Check Listings
RX100 (Ajay Bhupathi) Fri-Thurs
Sanju (Rajkumar Hirani) Fri-Thurs
Tamil Padam 2 (C. S. Amudhan) Fri-Thurs
Vijetha (Rakesh Sashi) Fri-Thurs
Big (Penny Marshall, 198) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Three Identical Strangers (Tim Wardle) Fri-Thurs
Sanju (Rajkumar Hirani) Fri-Thurs

Northwest Film Forum:

Larger Than Life: The Kevyn Aucoin Story (Tiffany Bartok) Fri-Sun
Damsel (David & Nathan Zellner) Fri-Thurs Skype Q&A 714
Sea to Shining Sea (Maximón Monihan) Weds, Thurs & Next Mon Only Filmmakers in Attendance

AMC Oak Tree:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Sanju (Rajkumar Hirani) Fri-Thurs
American Animals (Bart Layton) Fri-Thurs

AMC Seattle:

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Three Identical Strangers (Tim Wardle) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

Hands Across the Table (Mitchell Leisen, 1935) Thurs Only

SIFF Film Center:

Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist (Lorna Tucker) Fri-Thurs

Regal Thornton Place:

Three Identical Strangers (Tim Wardle) Fri-Thurs
Big (Penny Marshall, 198) Sun & Weds Only

SIFF Uptown:

The King (Eugene Jarecki) Fri-Thurs
The Last Suit (Pablo Solarz) Fri-Thurs
Hearts Beat Loud (Brett Haley) Fri-Thurs
Straight into a Storm (William Miller) Weds Only
Yellow Submarine (George Dunning, 1968) Sun Only

Varsity Theatre:

Big (Penny Marshall, 198) Weds Only

In Wide Release:

Ocean’s 8 (Gary Ross) Our Review
Solo (Ron Howard) Our Review
Avengers: Infinity War (Anthony & Joe Russo) Our Review
Isle of Dogs (Wes Anderson) Our Review