Friday August 19 – Thursday August

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Featured Film:

Lo & Behold at the SIFF Uptown

Werner Herzog brings his inimitable style to the Uptown this week for a documentary rumination on the internet, with Lo & Behold: Reveries of the Connected World. Taking a cue perhaps from the spacey disconnections of our hyperlinked present, the film is a series of stories about the internet and its impact on human lives. Some are more compelling than others, of course, but binding it all together is Herzog’s deadpan narration, always funny, sometimes insightful, occasionally baffling. It’s not one of the prolific director’s best works, or even as good as some of his recent documentaries like Cave of Forgotten Dreams  or Encounters at the End of the World, but it’s as good a film as one is like to find in these dark days of the end of summer.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Indignation (James Schamus) Fri-Thurs
Hell or High Water (David Mackenzie) Fri-Thurs
Operation Chromite (John H. Lee) Fri-Thurs
Run-Off (Kim Jong-hyun) Fri-Thurs

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Diary of a Wimpy Kid (Thor Freudenthal, 2010) Weds Only

Central Cinema:

The Goonies (Richard Donner, 1985) Fri-Tues
Hackers (Iain Softley, 1995) Fri-Tues

SIFF Egyptian:

Clue (Jonathan Lynn, 1985) Fri Midnight Only

Century Federal Way:

Operation Chromite (John H. Lee) Fri-Thurs
Main Teri Tu Mera (Ksshitij Chaudhary) Fri-Thurs
Thelma & Louise (Ridley Scott, 1991) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
The Sandlot (David M. Evans, 1993) Sat Only
Michael Clayton (Tony Gilroy, 2007) Mon Only
Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You (Heidi Ewing & Rachel Grady) Tues Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Debacle Records Presents: Marielle Jakobsons & special guest Chuck Johnson Fri Only Live Music & Video
Fantastic Planet (René Laloux, 1973) Sat & Thurs Only 35mm
Voice of the Eagle: The Enigma of Robbie Basho (Liam Barker) Tues Only
Score (Radley Metzger, 1972) Weds Only

Landmark Guild 45th:

Indignation (James Schamus) Fri-Thurs
Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Hell or High Water (David Mackenzie) Fri-Thurs
Indignation (James Schamus) Fri-Thurs
Rustom (Tinu Suresh Desai) Fri-Thurs
Happy Bhag Jayegi (Mudassar Aziz) Fri-Thurs
Mohenjo Daro (Maruthi) Fri-Thurs
Thelma & Louise (Ridley Scott, 1991) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Pelli Chupulu (Tharun Bhascker) Fri-Thurs
Hell or High Water (David Mackenzie) Fri-Thurs
Indignation (James Schamus) Fri-Thurs
Rustom (Tinu Suresh Desai) Fri-Thurs
Mohenjo Daro (Maruthi) Fri-Thurs

Northwest Film Forum:

‘Til Madness Do Us Part (Wang Bing) Fri-Thurs
Wedding Doll (Nitzan Gilady) Weds Only

AMC Oak Tree:

Imperium (Daniel Ragussis) Fri-Thurs
Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs

AMC Pacific Place:

Line Walker (Jazz Boon) Fri-Thurs
Sweet Sixteen (Jo Jin-kyu) Fri-Thurs
My Best Friend’s Wedding (Chen Feihong) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Hell or High Water (David Mackenzie) Fri-Thurs
Rustom (Tinu Suresh Desai) Fri-Thurs
Mohenjo Daro (Maruthi) Fri-Thurs
How to Be Yours (Dan Villegas) Fri-Thurs

Landmark Seven Gables:

Our Little Sister (Kore-eda Hirokazu) Fri-Thurs Our Review

SIFF Film Center:

Phantom Boy (Jean-Loup Felicioli & Alain Gagnol) Fri-Thurs

Sundance Cinemas:

Don’t Think Twice (Mike Birbiglia) Fri-Thurs
Hell or High Water (David Mackenzie) Fri-Thurs
Little Men (Ira Sachs) Fri-Thurs
Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV (Takeshi Nozue) Fri-Thurs

Regal Thornton Place:

Hell or High Water (David Mackenzie) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Cinema Uptown:

Lo & Behold: Reveries of the Connected World (Werner Herzog) Fri-Thurs
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs

Varsity Theatre:

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs

Yourself and Yours (Trailer) (Hong Sangsoo, 2016)

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Hong Sang-soo has a t-shirt. As reported by the seemingly omniscient Hong Sang-soo Web Twitter account, the 2016 Locarno Film Festival featured some sartorial branding inspired by last year’s top-prize recipient. If you were lucky enough to spend your August in a palatial Swiss town and decided that nothing said “European Summer” like shuffling between darkened movie theaters, you might have been lucky enough to snatch up one of the shirts, fittingly adorned with a tipsy sketch by the Korean master scrawled above the Hongian pseudo-motto: “Infinite Worlds Possible.” And just like that, with a major European festival prize now under his belt and branded UNIQLO-lite duds, it seems Hong has officially become an event.

Of course, we’re talking about the niche of the niche here. 18 films into his career Hong’s audience has grown more than some of the long-time loyalists likely thought possible, though he’s not exactly setting the box office ablaze. The yearly anticipation for his new film feels a bit more communal than it once did, still rolling around with the same regularity but with greater pomp among the ever-important Film Twitter cognoscenti. What self-respecting cine-kid doesn’t want a Hong shirt this time of year? It’s festival season. It’s Hong time. And right on cue, we got a trailer.

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Friday August 12 – Thursday August 18

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Featured Film:

Cockfighter at the Grand Illusion

There’s a lot of worthwhile repertory picks this week on Seattle Screens, including Blue Velvet and Blood Simple at the Uptown, a trio of Patrick Swayze classics at the Central Cinema and the Joe Hisaishi score of Buster Keaton’s The General that didn’t quite make it to SIFF getting a make-up pair of shows at the Uptown. But the must-see movie of the week is the Grand Illusion’s 35mm presentation of Monte Hellman’s 1974 classic Cockfighter, featuring a career-best performance from the great Warren Oates. Overshadowed by his 1971 masterpiece Two-Lane Blacktop, not least because of its cruel subject matter, it’s no less a brilliant exploration of the weirdness and beauty to be found at the margins of America. It plays Saturday night only, paired with the Grand Illusion’s week-long run of a new restoration of the 1960 Oates film Private Property.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Indignation (James Schamus) Fri-Thurs
Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs
Operation Chromite (John H. Lee) Fri-Thurs

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Harriet the Spy (Bronwen Hughes 1996) Weds Only

Central Cinema:

Dirty Dancing (Emile Ardolino, 1987) Fri-Tues
Road House (Rowdy Herrington, 1989) Fri-Tues
To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything! Julie Newmar (Beeban Kidron, 1995) Weds  Only

Century Federal Way:

Operation Chromite (John H. Lee) Fri-Thurs
Rustom (Tinu Suresh Desai) Fri-Thurs
Animal House (John Landis, 1978) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
The Kind Words (Shemi Zarhin) Tues Only
A Face in the Crowd (Elia Kazan, 1957) Weds Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Private Property (Leslie Stevens, 1960) Fri-Thurs
Lunch Meat (Kirk Alex, 1987) Fri Only VHS
Cockfighter (Monte Hellman, 1974) Sat Only 35mm

Landmark Guild 45th:

Indignation (James Schamus) Fri-Thurs
Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Hell or High Water (David Mackenzie) Fri-Thurs
Indignation (James Schamus) Fri-Thurs
Rustom (Tinu Suresh Desai) Fri-Thurs
Babu Bangaram (Maruthi) Fri-Thurs
Mohenjo Daro (Maruthi) Fri-Thurs
Animal House (John Landis, 1978) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Pelli Chupulu (Tharun Bhascker) Fri-Thurs
Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs
Hell or High Water (David Mackenzie) Fri-Thurs
Indignation (James Schamus) Fri-Thurs
Rustom (Tinu Suresh Desai) Fri-Thurs
Operation Chromite (John H. Lee) Fri-Thurs
Mohenjo Daro (Maruthi) Fri-Thurs

Northwest Film Forum:

‘Til Madness Do Us Part (Wang Bing) Starts Weds

AMC Oak Tree:

Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs

AMC Pacific Place:

My Best Friend’s Wedding (Chen Feihong) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs
Rustom (Tinu Suresh Desai) Fri-Thurs
Mohenjo Daro (Maruthi) Fri-Thurs
How to Be Yours (Dan Villegas) Fri-Thurs

Landmark Seven Gables:

Our Little Sister (Kore-eda Hirokazu) Fri-Thurs Our Review

SIFF Film Center:

My Love, Don’t Cross That River (Jin Mo-Young) Fri-Sun
Neither Heaven Nor Earth (Clément Cogitore) Fri-Sun

AMC Southcenter:

Operation Chromite (John H. Lee) Fri-Thurs
Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs

Sundance Cinemas:

Don’t Think Twice (Mike Birbiglia) Fri-Thurs
Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs
Amateur Night (Lisa Addario & Joe Syracuse) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Cinema Uptown:

Blue Velvet (David Lynch, 1986) Fri-Mon, Weds
Blood Simple (Joel & Ethan Coen, 1984) Fri-Mon, Weds-Thurs
The General (Buster Keaton & Clyde Bruckman, 1926) Sat & Sun Only Joe Hisaishi Score
Don’t Think Twice (Mike Birbiglia) Fri-Thurs
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
Tattoo Nation (Eric Schwartz, 2013) Thurs Only

Varsity Theatre:

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
Animal House (John Landis, 1978) Weds Only

Our Little Sister (Hirokazu Kore-eda, 2015)

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At the center of Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Our Little Sister is a house, and in the garden of the house is a plum tree. It is an old tree; generations of the family have seen it blossom and bear fruit, season by season. It is a tree at the heart of a house tradition, too, the making, storing, and consuming of umeshu, a sweet and sour green plum liqueur that is allowed to ripen to perfection over nine months beneath the floorboards. The family members prick their initials into the plums and these sit, soaking, as uniquely individual parts of the collective brew.

A family. A messy, powerful organism and a thing that Kore-eda, over the course of his film career, has continued to explore and expose, its raw bitternesses and its loving tendernesses. In earlier films, like Nobody Knows, heartbreak and tragedy are the centers of feeling; in more recent films, like I Wish, buoyant, infectious hope permeates. Our Little Sister tends towards the warmth of these latter films, and like the joyous, crucial moment of the speeding train in I Wish, there is a similarly ebullient defining moment in Our Little Sister, where two children on a bike fly through an avenue of blooming cherries.

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Friday August 5 – Thursday August 11

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Featured Film:

Charade at the Seattle Art Museum

SAM’s summer Cary Grant series comes to an end this Thursday night with his 1963 comic thriller Charade, co-starring Audrey Hepburn and directed by Stanley Donen. Riffing on Grant’s persona from his Hitchcock films To Catch a Thief and North By NorthwestCharade is often claimed to be the best non-Hitchcock Hitchcock film ever made. That’s not really accurate, better to say its the best non-musical film Donen ever made. We talked about it way back on Episode Three of The George Sanders Show, along with Jonathan Demme’s maligned but really not that bad 2002 remake The Truth About Charlie.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Train to Busan (Yeon Sang-ho) Fri-Thurs
Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Kit Kittridge: An American Girl (Patricia Rozema, 2008) Weds Only

Central Cinema:

Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (Mel Stuart, 1971) Fri-Sun
Pean’s Labyrinth (Guillermo del Toro, 2006) Fri-Mon
Jurassic Park (Steven Spielberg, 1993) Tues and Weds  Only

Century Federal Way:

Bambukat (Pankaj Batra) Fri-Thurs
Imagine You and Me (Mike Tuviera) Fri-Thurs
Batman (Tim Burton, 1989) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
The Innocents (Anne Fontaine) Fri-Thurs
The Music of Strangers (Morgan Neville) Fri-Thurs
Weiner (Josh Kriegcan & Elyse Steinberg) Tues Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Under the Sun (Vitaly Mansky) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Pulgasari (Shin Sang-ok, 1985) Sat Only VHS
Shot in the Dark: hand-crafted animated shorts from around the world Mon Only

Landmark Guild 45th:

Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs
Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Manamantha (Chandra Sekhar Yeleti) Fri-Thurs
Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs
Srirasthu Subhamasthu (Parasuram) Fri-Thurs
Batman (Tim Burton, 1989) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Pelli Chupulu (Tharun Bhascker) Fri-Thurs
Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs
Bazodee (Todd Kessler) Fri-Thurs

AMC Oak Tree:

Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs

AMC Pacific Place:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
League of Gods (Koan Hui & Vernie Yeung) Fri-Thurs
Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Bazodee (Todd Kessler) Fri-Thurs
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
How to Be Yours (Dan Villegas) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

Charade (Stanley Donen, 1963) Thurs Only Our Podcast

Landmark Seven Gables:

Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

Band of Outsiders (Jean-Luc Godard, 1964) Fri-Sun
Kamikaze ’89 (Wolf Gremm, 1982) Fri-Sun
Le chèvre (Francis Veber, 1981) Weds Only
Weepah Way For Now (Stephen Ringer) Thurs Only

AMC Southcenter:

Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs
Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs

Sundance Cinemas:

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
Roseanne for President (Eric Weinrib) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Cinema Uptown:

The Innocents (Anne Fontaine) Fri-Thurs
Don’t Think Twice (Mike Birbiglia) Fri-Thurs Director Q & A Friday Night
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
Train to Busan (Yeon Sang-ho) Fri-Thurs
48 Hour Film Project Mon Only

Friday July 29 – Thursday August 5

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Featured Film:

Black Girl at the Grand Illusion

With the darkest days of summer upon us and seemingly every art house theatre in Seattle playing some combination of Captain Fantastic, Hunt for the Wilderpeople, Train to Busan or Café Society, the venerable Grand Illusion stands out with its presentation of Ousmane Sembène’s classic of African cinema, the 1966 film Black Girl. Playing in a new restoration to commemorate its 50th Anniversary, and paired with his 1963 debut film Borom SarretBlack Girl is about a young Senegalese woman who works as a domestic servant in France.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Train to Busan (Yeon Sang-ho) Fri-Thurs
Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Howl’s Moving Castle (Hayao Miyazaki, 2004) Weds Only

Central Cinema:

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (Stephen Spielberg, 1989) Fri-Mon
Pee Wee’s Big Adventure (Tim Burton, 1985) Fri-Tues
Black Dynamite (Scott Sanders, 2009) Tues Only

Century Federal Way:

Bambukat (Pankaj Batra) Fri-Thurs
Train to Busan (Yeon Sang-ho) Fri-Thurs
Imagine You and Me (Mike Tuviera) Fri-Thurs
Gone with the Wind (Victor Fleming, 1939) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
The Innocents (Anne Fontaine) Fri-Thurs
Lucha Mexico (Alex Hammond & Ian Markiewicz) Fri & Sat Only
Margarita with a Straw (Shonali Bose & Nilesh Maniyar) Tues Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Black Girl (Osemane Sembène, 1966) Fri-Thurs
Kamillions (Mikel B. Anderson, 1990) Fri Only VHS
Cinememory: Negotiating the Past Through Film Tues Only Video

Landmark Guild 45th:

Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs
Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs
Dishoom (Rohit Dhawan) Fri-Thurs
Gleason (J. Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs
Kabali (Pa. Ranjith) Fri-Thurs In Tamil with subtitles & Telugu without subtitles, check showtimes
Gone with the Wind (Victor Fleming, 1939) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Pelli Chupulu (Tharun Bhascker) Fri-Thurs

Northwest Film Forum:

LIGHTHOUSE: An Evening With Paul Clipson Fri Only Live Performance, 16mm
Dig! (Ondi Timoner, 2004) Fri-Sun Only 35mm
Chicagoland Shorts Vol. 2 Sat Only
Speculation Nation (Sabine Gruffat & Bill Brown, 2014) Sun Only Filmmakers in Attendance

AMC Pacific Place:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
League of Gods (Koan Hui & Vernie Yeung) Fri-Thurs
Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Sultan (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (HC Potter, 1948) Thurs Only

Landmark Seven Gables:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

Last Cab to Darwin (Jeremy Sims) Fri-Sun
The Thanhouser Studio and the Birth of American Cinema (Ned Thanhouser) Sat Only

AMC Southcenter:

Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs

Sundance Cinemas:

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
The Lobster (Yorgos Lanthimos) Fri-Thurs
Swiss Army Man (Dan Kwan & Daniel Scheinert) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Eva Hesse (Marcie Dale) Fri-Thurs
Eat that Question (Thorsten Schütte) Fri-Thurs

Regal Thornton Place:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Cinema Uptown:

The Innocents (Anne Fontaine) Fri-Thurs
Microbe and Gasoline (Michel Gondry) Fri-Thurs
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
Train to Busan (Yeon Sang-ho) Fri-Thurs

In Wide Release:

Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates (Jake Szymanski) Our Review

For a Few Bullets (Pan Anzi, 2016)

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Opening yesterday here in Seattle after debuting a week ago in China, For a Few Bullets is a goofy adventure film, mishmash of references as haphazardly assembled as its not-quite Leone title. Set in 1940, it’s a treasure hunt chase, with a con man enlisted by a Chinese secret agent to prevent the Japanese military from stealing a MacGuffin, the imperial seal used by the first Qin Emperor. Influenced by decades of knock-offs of the Indiana Jones and Mission: Impossible films, it mixes a series of elaborate heists with a budding romance between the toothy, supercilious Lin Gengxin and the tough, serious-minded agent, Zhang Jingchu. She’s the best thing in the film, tightly-coiled and super-competent in the first half, but, inevitably, sadly, melting into a flowing-tressed, red-dressed, damsel in distress in the second. She literally spends the climactic scene chained to a rock like Andromeda facing the Kraken, while Lin faces-off against the film’s master villain. He’s a monster straight out of a comic book, gas-masked and leather-jacketed, a WWII-era Vader with unexplainable supernatural powers and a collection of severed heads to rival the Faceless Men of Braavos.

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After a dizzying opening twenty minutes, with exposition and character background flashing on screen in comic book panels, text captions and quick, almost sensible actions scenes, the film settles down to a hectic, but comprehensible rhythm. Lin and Zhang meet up with the long lost King of Hustlers, played by Mongolian singing superstar Tengger. He’s a likable presence, an Eric Tsang type, smirking and smarter than he looks. The three travel from Northwest China across the country to Shanghai and Nanjing, trying to capture the MacGuffin as it is transported by train. This gives ample opportunity to show off some stunning locations, desert landscapes and Central Asian steppes that have only rarely been seen on-screen, the colors digitally-enhanced to fantastical levels, a slick, luminous beauty that’s as insubstantial as it is picturesque. The humor is broad, the action quick and polished, if not particularly athletic, and a healthy amount of anachronism, most obviously some elaborate Scooby-Doo-style mask work. This is film as confection, a cotton candy picture that looks neat, has some fun action-heist sequences, pretty pictures, prettier people and nothing of any real substance. Last year’s Mojin: The Lost Legend attempted to tap this same treasure-hunting vein, far less successfully as an adventure, done in as it was by murky special effects. But that film also reached back to the Cultural Revolution and forward to immigrant life in America in creating some depth for its central romance. For a Few Bullets has no such ambitions. It’s nice enough though, and everyone looks like they’re having a good time. We can tell because they’re smiling all through the movie, and in the end-credits blooper reel.

Friday July 22 – Thursday July 28

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Featured Film:

King Hu and Noir City at the SIFF Uptown and Egyptian

Sneaking into the Uptown for a mere one show apiece on Friday, Saturday and Sunday are two of the greatest Chinese language films of all-time. King Hu‘s Dragon Gate Inn perfected the wuxia genre in 1968. It’s a propulsive, meticulous action film that set the standard for the next 50 years of martial arts film, inspiring remakes and homages from Ang Lee, Tsai Ming-liang and Tsui Hark (who has remade it at least twice). Hu followed it up three years later with A Touch of Zen, which not only improved on the action, but transformed the generic material into a abstract exploration of transcendence and faith. There is likely to be no film on Seattle Screens this year that will benefit more from being seen on the big screen.
In an embarrassment of riches, SIFF is also presenting Eddie Muller’s traveling Noir City festival all this week at the Egyptian. Structured as a series of old-style double features (prestige A-picture along with a shorter, cheaper B-movie), highlights include: I Wake Up Screaming, This Gun for Hire, The 7th Victim, Scarlet Street, My Name is Julia Ross, The Dark Corner, The Reckless Moment and Gun Crazy. All 18 films in the series are playing on 35mm.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Train to Busan (Yeon Sang-ho) Fri-Thurs

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (Brad Silberling, 2004) Weds Only

Central Cinema:

The Neverending Story (Wolfgang Petersen, 1984) Fri-Tues
Wet Hot American Summer (David Wain, 2001) Fri-Tues

SIFF Egyptian:

Noir City 2016: Film Noir From A to B Fri-Thurs Full Program 35mm

Century Federal Way:

Kabali (Pa. Ranjith) Fri-Thurs In Tamil with subtitles & Telugu without subtitles, check showtimes
Train to Busan (Yeon Sang-ho) Fri-Thurs
Planet of the Apes (Franklin J. Schaffer, 1968) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Swiss Army Man (Dan Kwan & Daniel Scheinert) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
Genius (Michael Grandage) Fri-Thurs
Our Kind of Traitor (Susanna White) Fri-Thurs
Dough (John Goldschmidt) Fri-Thurs
The Confirmation (Bob Nelson) Tues Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Land and Shade (César Augusto Acevedo) Fri-Thurs
The Colossus of Destiny: A Melvins Tale  Sat & Sun Only
Cinememory: Negotiating the Past Through Film Tues Only Video

Landmark Guild 45th:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs
Sultan (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs
Kabali (Pa. Ranjith) Fri-Thurs In Tamil with subtitles & Telugu without subtitles, check showtimes
Planet of the Apes (Franklin J. Schaffer, 1968) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

One Night Only (Matt Wu) Fri-Thurs Our Review 
Cold War 2 (Longman Leung & Sunny Luk) Fri-Thurs Our Review
The Lobster (Yorgos Lanthimos) Fri-Thurs
Swiss Army Man (Dan Kwan & Daniel Scheinert) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Northwest Film Forum:

Legend (Ridley Scott, 1985) Sat Only Live Soundtrack
Selections from Pioneers of African-American Cinema Weds Only Members Only
The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971) Sat Only Live Soundtrack

AMC Pacific Place:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
For a Few Bullets (Anzi Pan) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Café Society (Woody Allen) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Love & Friendship (Whit Stillman) Fri-Thurs Our Review 
Sultan (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

Arsenic & Old Lace (Frank Capra, 1944) Thurs Only

Landmark Seven Gables:

Life, Animated (Roger Ross Williams) Fri-Thurs
Tickled (David Farrier & Dylan Reeve) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You (Heidi Ewing & Rachel Grady) Fri-Thurs
Tikkun (Avishai Sivan) Fri-Thurs

Sundance Cinemas:

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
The Lobster (Yorgos Lanthimos) Fri-Thurs
Swiss Army Man (Dan Kwan & Daniel Scheinert) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Music of Strangers (Morgan Neville) Fri-Thurs
The Measure of a Man (Stéphane Brizé) Fri-Thurs
Eat that Question (Thorsten Schütte) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Cinema Uptown:

A Touch of Zen (King Hu, 1971) Fri-Sun Our Podcast
Dragon Gate Inn (King Hu, 1968) Fri-Sun Our Review
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
Beta Test (Nicholas Gyeney) Fri-Sun
48 Hour Film Project Mon-Weds

Varsity Theatre:

Planet of the Apes (Franklin J. Schaffer, 1968) Weds Only

In Wide Release:

Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates (Jake Szymanski) Our Review

One Night Only (Matt Wu, 2016)

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An Aaron Kwok movie is opening on Seattle Screens for the second time in three weeks, as the now venerable pop star/actor follows up his taciturn performance as the cooly rational police bureaucrat in Cold War 2 with a turn as a compulsive gambler with unresolved family issues in Matt Wu’s One Night Only. It’s the Taiwanese Wu’s directorial debut and also stars his wife, Yang Zishan, who starred in Three actress Zhao Wei’s directorial debut So Young a few years ago, an unrelated sequel to which called Never Gone opened last week at the Pacific Place. Like a lot of debut films, One Night Only is positively bursting with ideas and influences, its a work of exuberant cinephilia, pulling together elements of films as disparate as Nights of Cabiria, Rebel Without a Cause, 2046, One Night in Mongkok, the Fast and the Furious series and what I imagine Nicholas Sparks films are like into a movie that resolutely refuses to simply be one thing, but rather changes shape every reel or so in a way that never quite holds together, but is nonetheless fascinating in its audacity. It recalls last year’s under-the-radar gem of diasporic Chinese cinema, Go Away Mr. Tumor, a film that juggled the demands of the cute CGI rom-com and the cancer melodrama far more successfully than it had any right to. One Night Only doesn’t hang together quite as well, or at all even, but it’s got more energy than almost any movie you’re likely to see at the multiplex this summer.

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Friday July 15 – Thursday July 21

Philadelphia Story, The (1940) | Pers: Katharine Hepburn, James Stewart | Dir: George Cukor | Ref: PHI001AH | Photo Credit: [ MGM / The Kobal Collection ] | Editorial use only related to cinema, television and personalities. Not for cover use, advertising or fictional works without specific prior agreement

Featured Film:

David Lynch and Cary Grant at the Seattle Art Museum

I suppose Fire Walk with Me and The Philadelphia Story go together too well for it to be entirely a coincidence that they’re playing on consecutive nights this week at the Art Museum. One is a nightmarish vision of an insular, thoroughly misogynistic  community, packed with quirky, lunatic performances, featuring a healthy amount of substance abuse and a deeply self-deluded father’s seriously messed-up relationship with his daughter. The other is the big screen prequel to a celebrated television series. Hearthfires and holocausts indeed. We talked about Fire Walk with Me earlier this year on the first episode of The Frances Farmer Show.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Sultan (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

The Fits (Anna Rose Holmer) Fri-Thurs
The Iron Giant (Brad Bird, 1999) Weds Only

Central Cinema:

The Princess Bride (Rob Reiner, 1987) Fri-Tues
Conan the Barbarian (John Milius, 1982) Fri-Tues

SIFF Egyptian:

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs

Century Federal Way:

Fight Club (David Fincher 1999) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

Love & Friendship (Whit Stillman) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Therapy for a Vampire (David Ruhm) Fri-Thurs
Older than Ireland (Alex Fegan) Fri-Thurs
Genius (Michael Grandage) Fri-Thurs
Our Kind of Traitor (Susanna White) Fri-Thurs
Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (Tim Burton, 1985) Sat Only
Music of Strangers (Morgan Neville) Tues Only
Monty Python and the Holy Grail (Terry Gilliam & Terry Jones, 1975) Weds Only Quote-Along

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Lucha Mexico (Alex Hammond & Ian Markiewicz) Fri-Thurs
Lizard in a Woman’s Skin (Lucio Fulci, 1971) Fri & Sat Only
Eric Ostrowski: Avenue of the Dead Tues Only 16mm, Video, Live Sounds
Industrial Musicals Thurs Only

Landmark Guild 45th:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
Our Kind of Traitor (Susanna White) Fri-Thurs
Sultan (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs
Godhi Banna Sadharana Mykattu (Hemanth Rao) Fri-Thurs
Fight Club (David Fincher 1999) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Cold War 2 (Longman Leung & Sunny Luk) Fri-Thurs Our Review 
Sultan (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs
The Lobster (Yorgos Lanthimos) Fri-Thurs

Northwest Film Forum:

Right Now, Wrong Then (Hong Sangsoo) Fri-Sun Our Review 
Sixty Six (Lewis Klahr) Fri Only Filmmaker in Attendance
#Comments Sat Only Filmmaker in Attendance
B-Movie: Lust & Sound in West Berlin 1979-1989 (Jörg A. Hoppe, Klaus Maeck & Heiko Lange) Weds Only
White Star (Roland Klick, 1983) Weds & Thurs Only
Decoder (Muscha, 1984) Thurs Only
Actress (Robert Greene, 2014) Thurs Only Director in Attendance Our Review

AMC Loews Oak Tree:

Sultan (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs

AMC Pacific Place:

Captain Fantastic (Matt Ross) Fri-Thurs
So Young 2: Never Gone (Zhou Tuo Ru) Fri-Thurs
When Larry Met Larry (Wen Zhang) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Love & Friendship (Whit Stillman) Fri-Thurs Our Review 
Sultan (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs
Maggie’s Plan (Rebecca Miller) Fri-Thurs
Our Kind of Traitor (Susanna White) Fri-Thurs

Seattle Art Museum:

Fire Walk with Me (David Lynch, 1992) Weds Only Our Podcast
The Philadelphia Story (George Cukor, 1940) Thurs Only

Landmark Seven Gables:

Life, Animated (Roger Ross Williams) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

NUTS! (Penny Lane) Fri-Sun

Sundance Cinemas:

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (Taika Waititi) Fri-Thurs
The Lobster (Yorgos Lanthimos) Fri-Thurs
Maggie’s Plan (Rebecca Miller) Fri-Thurs
Music of Strangers (Morgan Neville) Fri-Thurs
Seoul Searching (Benson Lee) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Zero Days (Alex Gibney) Fri-Thurs
Vita Activa: The Spirit of Hannah Arendt (Ada Ushpiz) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Cinema Uptown:

Life, Animated (Roger Ross Williams) Fri-Thurs
The Kind Words (Hamilim Hatovot Fri-Thurs
NUTS! (Penny Lane) Mon-Thurs

Varsity Theatre:

Wiener-Dog (Todd Solondz) Fri-Thurs

In Wide Release:

Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates (Jake Szymanski) Our Review 
Swiss Army Man (Dan Kwan & Daniel Scheinert) Our Review