Friday June 7 – Thursday June 13

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Featured Film:

Asako I & II at the Northwest Film Forum

One of the year’s best films opens this week at the NWFF, with the latest from Ryûsuke Hamaguchi. After breaking out with his five+ hour 2015 film Happy Hour, it’s a bit of a surprise to see Hamaguchi working within the confines of high-concept mainstream romance, but what marks him as one of the finest directors working today is his attention to the smallest details of character and performance (check out Evan’s look at his early films over at Mubi). In his hands, a plot that might have been a run of the mill slice of life anime turns into something special, a sincere look at the confusions and exhilarations of being a young person in love, and the compromises we make to stay that way in adulthood.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Bharat (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs 
The Gangster, the Cop, the Devil (Lee Wontae) Fri-Thurs 

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 

Central Cinema:

The Terminator (James Cameron, 1984) Fri, Sat, Mon & Tues
The Iron Giant (Brad Bird, 1999) Fri-Mon 
The Matrix Reloaded (Lilly & Lana Wachowski, 2003) Weds Only 

SIFF Egyptian:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

Century Federal Way:

Laiye Je Yarrian (Sukh Sanghera) Fri-Thurs 

Grand Cinema:

The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg) Fri-Thurs 
The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 
Red Joan (Trevor Nunn) Fri-Thurs 
The Wind Rises (Hayao Miyazaki, 2013) Sat Only Subtitled
Run Lola Run (Tom Tykwer, 1999) Sat Only 
Stockholm (Robert Budreau) Tues Only 
Wasted! The Story of Food Waste (Anna Chai & Nari Kye) Weds Only 

Grand Illusion Cinema:

General Magic (Sarah Kerruish & Matt Maude) Fri-Thurs Filmmaker in attendance on Thurs
Made in Abyss: Journey’s Dawn (Masayuki Kojima) Sat & Sun Only 

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Virus (Aashiq Abu) Fri-Thurs 
The Gangster, the Cop, the Devil (Lee Wontae) Fri-Thurs 
Bharat (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs 
Hippi (Krishna) Fri-Thurs 
Kolaigaran (Andrew Louis) Fri-Thurs 
The Mosquito Philosophy (Jayaprakash Radhakrishnan) Sun Only 

Regal Meridian:

Bharat (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs 
The Tomorrow Man (Noble Lincoln Jones) Fri-Thurs 

Northwest Film Forum:

Asako I & II (Ryûsuke Hamaguchi) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Walking on Water (Andrey Paounov) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Oak Tree:

The Tomorrow Man (Noble Lincoln Jones) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Pacific Place:

Chasing the Dragon 2: Wild Wild Bunch (Jason Kwan & Wong Jing) Fri-Thurs 
My Best Summer (Zhang Disha) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

De De Pyaar De (Akiv Ali) Fri-Thurs 
Bharat (Ali Abbas Zafar) Fri-Thurs 
Loopers: The Caddie’s Long Walk (Jason Baffa) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Seattle:

The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg) Fri-Thurs 
The Tomorrow Man (Noble Lincoln Jones) Fri-Thurs 
The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Film Center:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

AMC Southcenter:

The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Uptown:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

Friday May 31 – Thursday June 6

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Featured Film:

SIFF Week Three

The Seattle International Film Festival is still going. Some of the titles we’re looking forward to this week include: Legend of the Stardust Brothers, an experimental Japanese film from 1985 that SIFF is billing as a goofy camp oddity; Enamorada, a classic Mexican melodrama starring María Félix and Pedro Armendáriz; Distinction, the new solo film from Trivisa and Ten Years co-director Jevons Au; I Am Cuba, the restoration of the Soviet-Cuban propaganda film that is quite simply one of the best movies ever made; One, Two Three, one of Billy Wilder’s most underrated movies, a screwball about Cold War capitalism starring a never-better James Cagney; and Romanian director Radu Jude’s latest, I Do Not Care If We Go Down In History As Barbarians.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

Central Cinema:

Dazed and Confused (Richard Linklater, 1993) Fri-Tues
The Princess Bride (Rob Reiner, 1987) Fri-Tues 
The Matrix (Lilly & Lana Wachowski, 1999) Weds Only 

SIFF Egyptian:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

Century Federal Way:

Muklawa (Simerjit Singh) Fri-Thurs 
Saving Private Ryan (Steven Spielberg, 1998) Sun & Weds Only 

Grand Cinema:

The Man who Killed Don Quixote (Terry Gilliam) Fri-Thurs 
The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 
Tell It to the Bees (Annabel Jankel) Fri-Thurs 
Red Joan (Trevor Nunn) Fri-Thurs 
Castle in the Sky (Hayao Miyazaki, 1986) Sat Only Subtitled
Neither Wolf nor Dog (Steven Lewis Simpson) Mon Only 
The Public (Emilio Estevez) Tues Only 

Grand Illusion Cinema:

The Man who Killed Don Quixote (Terry Gilliam) Fri-Thurs 
The Wind (Emma Tammi) Fri-Thurs 

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

NGK (Selvaraghavan) Fri-Thurs 
The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 
De De Pyaar De (Akiv Ali) Fri-Thurs 
Falaknuma Das (Vishwaksen Naidu) Fri-Thurs 
Saving Private Ryan (Steven Spielberg, 1998) Sun & Weds Only 

Regal Meridian:

The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg) Fri-Thurs 

Northwest Film Forum:

Walking on Water (Andrey Paounov) Fri-Tues, Thurs 
The Image You Missed (Dónal Foreman) Sat & Sun Only 

AMC Pacific Place:

The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

De De Pyaar De (Akiv Ali) Fri-Thurs 
The White Crow (Ralph Fiennes) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Seattle:

The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Film Center:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

AMC Southcenter:

The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Thornton Place:

Saving Private Ryan (Steven Spielberg, 1998) Sun & Weds Only 

SIFF Uptown:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

Varsity Theatre:

Domino (Brian De Plama) Fri-Thurs 
Saving Private Ryan (Steven Spielberg, 1998) Sun Only 

Friday May 24 – Thursday May 30

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Featured Film:

SIFF Week Two

The Seattle International Film Festival rolls into its second week, and highlights include: Ying Liang’s semi-autobiographical A Family Tour; Mrs. Purple, Justin Chon’s follow-up to his popular debut feature Gook; No. 1 Chung Ying Street, Derek Chiu’s excellent film about two generations of protestors in Hong Kong; Pauline Kael documentary What She Said; Ida Lupino’s melodrama The Bigamist and her classic noir The Hitch-Hiker; Peter Strickland’s In Fabric; and Olivier Assayas’s very funny satire of upper-class literary twits, Non-Fiction.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

The White Crow (Ralph Fiennes) Fri-Thurs  

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

Central Cinema:

Predator (John McTiernan, 1987) Fri-Tues
Princess Mononoke (Hayao Miyazaki, 1997) Fri-Weds Dubbed and Subtitled, Check Listings 
Tales from Earthsea (Gorō Miyazaki, 2006) Weds Only Subtitled

SIFF Egyptian:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

Century Federal Way:

Chandigarh Amritsar Chandigarh (Karan R Guliani) Fri-Thurs 
Muklawa (Simerjit Singh) Fri-Thurs 

Grand Cinema:

Meeting Gorbachev (Werner Herzog) Fri-Thurs  
The Serengeti Rules (Nicolas Brown) Fri-Thurs 
Nureyev (David Morris, Jacqui Morris) Fri-Thurs 
The White Crow (Ralph Fiennes) Fri-Thurs  
Red Joan (Trevor Nunn) Fri-Thurs 
Howl’s Moving Castle (Hayao Miyazaki, 2004) Sat Only Subtitled
Fight Club (David Fincher, 1999) Sat Only 
Ask Dr. Ruth (Ryan White) Tues Only 
Iyengar: The Man, Yoga, and The Student’s Journey (Jake Clennell) Weds Only 
Satan & Adam (V. Scott Balcerek) Thurs Only 

Grand Illusion Cinema:

The Man who Killed Don Quixote (Terry Gilliam) Fri-Thurs 
The Wind (Emma Tammi) Fri-Thurs 
SMUT SHOW II: Peace, Love, and Hardcore Tues Only 16mm

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Maharshi (Vamsi Paidipally) Fri-Thurs 
The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 
De De Pyaar De (Akiv Ali) Fri-Thurs 
India’s Most Wanted (Raj Kumar Gupta) Fri-Thurs 
PM Narendra Modi (Omung Kumar) Fri-Thurs 
Sita (Anup Rubens) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Meridian:

The White Crow (Ralph Fiennes) Fri-Thurs 
Photograph (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs 

Northwest Film Forum:

The Serengeti Rules (Nicolas Brown) Fri-Sun, Tues 
Travessias Brazilian Film Festival – Short Film Program Fri & Sat Only 
Scott Walker: 30th Century Man (Stephen Kijak, 2008) Sun Only 
Minute Bodies: The Intimate World of F. Percy Smith (Stuart A. Staples) Weds & Thurs Only 
Embrace of the Serpent (Ciro Guerra) Thurs Only 

AMC Pacific Place:

The Biggest Little Farm (John Chester) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Student of the Year 2 (Punit Malhotra) Fri-Thurs 
De De Pyaar De (Akiv Ali) Fri-Thurs 
The White Crow (Ralph Fiennes) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Seattle:

Photograph (Ritesh Batra) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Film Center:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

SIFF Uptown:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

Varsity Theatre:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

Friday May 17 – Thursday May 23

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Featured Film:

SIFF Week One

It’s time again for the marathon of movie-watching that is the Seattle International Film Festival. As usual we’ll be covering the festival with a variety of reviews, capsule reviews and probably a podcast. Some of the titles we’re looking forward to in this first week include: the Vietnamese drama The Third Wife, Mark Cousins’s new doc Storm in My Heart, Jafar Panahi’s latest 3 Faces, the neo-giallo Knife + Heart, omnibus film Ten Years Thailand, revivals of Fritz Lang’s Spione and Joan Micklin Silver’s Between the Lines, Louis Garrel’s A Faithful Man and Jennifer Kent’s The Nightingale.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Trial by Fire (Edward Zwick) Fri-Thurs 
Student of the Year 2 (Punit Malhotra) Fri-Thurs 

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

Central Cinema:

Cape Fear (Martin Scorsese, 1991) Fri, Sat, Mon-Weds
Ponyo (Hayao Miyazaki, 2008) Fri-Weds Dubbed and Subtitled, Check Listings 

SIFF Egyptian:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

Century Federal Way:

Steel Magnolias (Herbert Ross, 1989) Sun & Weds Only 

Grand Cinema:

The White Crow (Ralph Fiennes) Fri-Thurs  
Red Joan (Trevor Nunn) Fri-Thurs 
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
Kiki’s Delivery Service (Hayao Miyazaki, 1989) Sat Only Two Showings, Dubbed or Subtitled Our Review 
Nureyev (David Morris, Jacqui Morris) Sat & Sun Only 
Bad Black (Nabwana IGG, 2016) Sat Only Our Review 
The Crow (Alex Proyas, 1994) Mon Only 
The Most Dangerous Year (Vlada Knowlton) Tues Only 
The Hate U Give (George Tillman Jr.) Weds Only Free Screening

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Her Smell (Alex Ross Perry) Fri-Sun Our Review 
Aniara (Pella Kågerman & Hugo Lilja) Fri-Thurs 
Instant Dreams (Willem Baptist) Sat-Sun, Tues-Weds 
Blood Lake (Tim Boggs, 1987) Mon Only Members Only, RSVP req.

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Maharshi (Vamsi Paidipally) Fri-Thurs 
Trial by Fire (Edward Zwick) Fri-Thurs 
Student of the Year 2 (Punit Malhotra) Fri-Thurs 
ABCD (Sanjeev Reddy) Fri-Thurs 
De De Pyaar De (Akiv Ali) Fri-Thurs 
Mr. Local (M. Rajesh) Fri-Thurs 
Steel Magnolias (Herbert Ross, 1989) Sun & Weds Only 

Regal Meridian:

Trial by Fire (Edward Zwick) Fri-Thurs 
The White Crow (Ralph Fiennes) Fri-Thurs 
Student of the Year 2 (Punit Malhotra) Fri-Thurs 

Northwest Film Forum:

The Most Dangerous Year (Vlada Knowlton) Fri-Tues 
The Feeling of being Watched (Assia Boundaoui) Fri-Sun 
Scott Walker: 30th Century Man (Stephen Kijak, 2008) Sun-Tues & Thurs Only 
A Tribute to Barbara Hammer: Making Movies out of Sex and Life Weds Only 
The Serengeti Rules (Nicolas Brown) Starts Weds 

AMC Pacific Place:

Shadow (Zhang Yimou) Fri-Thurs Our Review 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Student of the Year 2 (Punit Malhotra) Fri-Thurs 
De De Pyaar De (Akiv Ali) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Seattle:

The Chaperone (Michael Engler) Fri-Thurs 
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Film Center:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

AMC Southcenter:

The Chaperone (Michael Engler) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Uptown:

The 2019 Seattle International Film Festival Full Program 

Varsity Theatre:

Red Joan (Trevor Nunn) Fri-Thurs 
We Have Always Lived in the Castle (Stacie Passon) Fri-Thurs 
The Professor (Wayne Roberts) Fri-Thurs 
Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind (Hayao Miyazaki, 1984) Mon & Tues Only Our Podcast 
Steel Magnolias (Herbert Ross, 1989) Weds Only 

Friday May 10 – Thursday May 16

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Featured Film:

Shadow at the Grand Illusion and the Pacific Place

Zhang Yimou’s latest decorous wuxia opens this week at the Grand Illusion and the Pacific Place. It isn’t as great a film as Hero or House of Flying Daggers, but its black white and gray color palette, inspired by traditional ink wash painting, is certainly something we’ve never seen before, as is its impressive use of umbrellas. Set loosely in the Three Kingdoms era, Shadow spends a lot of time establishing a convoluted conspiracy the goal of which is to maneuver two states into war. Deng Chao plays a dual role as the evil general and his more honorable double, and his broad performances detract from whatever nuance there is to the movie. But the action is great and the whole thing looks pretty cool.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Student of the Year 2 (Punit Malhotra) Fri-Thurs 

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

Central Cinema:

Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979) Fri-Weds
Kiki’s Delivery Service (Hayao Miyazaki, 1989) Fri-Weds Dubbed and Subtitled, Check Listings Our Review

SIFF Egyptian:

Ask Dr. Ruth (Ryan White) Fri-Sun 

Century Federal Way:

Lukan Michi (M. Hundal) Fri-Thurs 

Grand Cinema:

Maze (Stephen Burke) Fri-Thurs 
Hail Satan? (Penny Lane) Fri-Thurs 
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
253 Short Film Party Fri Only 
Cowboy in Sweden (Torbjorn Axelman & Charlie Wallace, 1970) Sat Only 
Babylon (Franco Rosso, 1980) Tues Only 
Cleo from 5 to 7 (Agnès Varda, 1962) Weds Only 
The Phantom of the Opera (Rupert Julian, 1925) Thurs Only Live Score

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Shadow (Zhang Yimou) Fri-Thurs Our Review 

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Maharshi (Vamsi Paidipally) Fri-Thurs 
Kee (Kalees) Fri-Thurs 
Student of the Year 2 (Punit Malhotra) Fri-Thurs 
Uyare (Manu Ashokan) Fri-Thurs 
Vellaipookal (Vivek Elangovan) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Meridian:

Maharshi (Vamsi Paidipally) Fri-Thurs 
The White Crow (Ralph Fiennes) Fri-Thurs 
Student of the Year 2 (Punit Malhotra) Fri-Thurs 

Northwest Film Forum:

If the Dancer Dances (Maia Wechsler) Fri-Thurs 
Adventures of Aladdin (Glenn Campbell) Fri-Thurs 
Carmine Street Guitars (Ron Mann) Fri, Sun & Thurs Only 
Shelf Life (Paul Bartel, 1993) Sat Only Q&A with Writers and Stars
Take it Down! (Sabine Gruffat & Bill Brown) Weds Only 

AMC Pacific Place:

Shadow (Zhang Yimou) Fri-Thurs Our Review 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Student of the Year 2 (Punit Malhotra) Fri-Thurs 
El Chicano (Ben Bray) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Seattle:

The Chaperone (Michael Engler) Fri-Thurs 
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

Seattle Art Museum:

The Wrong Box (Bryan Forbes, 1966) Thurs Only 

AMC Southcenter:

El Chicano (Ben Bray) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Uptown:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Sun
Hail Satan? (Penny Lane) Fri-Sun
High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Sun Our Discussion 
Her Smell (Alex Ross Perry) Fri-Sun Our Review

Varsity Theatre:

Red Joan (Trevor Nunn) Fri-Thurs 
Charlie Says (Mary Harron) Fri-Thurs 

Friday May 3 – Thursday May 9

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Featured Film:

High Life at the SIFF Uptown

I’m either a week ahead or a week behind, having already reviewed the Chinese movie that’s opening here next week (Shadow) but not yet two of the ones that are playing this week (Suburban Birds and Savage). I’ll get to those in a couple of days, and I hope to catch up to Alex Ross Perry’s Her Smell (which opens on Sunday at the Uptown) soon as well. But I’m going with Claire Denis’s English-language sci-fi movie with Juliette Binoche and Robert Pattinson as the Featured Film this week, because it’s probably the last chance we’ll have to see it here in Seattle (yeah, I haven’t watched it yet either) and Evan and Lawrence had an excellent discussion about it a couple of weeks ago.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

El Chicano (Ben Bray) Fri-Thurs 

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

Central Cinema:

Airplane! (David Zucker, Jim Abrahams & Jerry Zucker, 1980) Fri-Weds
Porco Rosso (Hayao Miyazaki, 1992) Fri-Weds Dubbed and Subtitled, Check Listings

SIFF Egyptian:

Ask Dr. Ruth (Ryan White) Fri-Thurs 

Century Federal Way:

Blackia (Sukhminder Dhanjal) Fri-Thurs 
True Grit (Henry Hathaway, 1969) Sun & Weds Only Our Podcast

Grand Cinema:

Wild Nights with Emily (Madeleine Olnek) Fri-Thurs 
Hail Satan? (Penny Lane) Fri-Thurs 
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
The Blair Witch Project (Eduardo Sánchez & Daniel Myrick, 1999) Sat Only 
Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché (Pamela B. Green) Tues Only 

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Dogman (Matteo Garrone) Fri-Thurs 
Hard Ticket to Hawaii (Andy Sidaris) Fri, Sat & Tues Only 

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Jersey (Gowtam Tinnanuri) Fri-Thurs 
Kalank (Abhishek Verman) Fri-Thurs 
Nuvvu Thopu Ra (Harinath Babu B) Fri & Sat Only 
Oru Yamandan Premakadha (B.C. Noufal) Fri-Thurs 
Vellaipookal (Vivek Elangovan) Fri-Thurs 
True Grit (Henry Hathaway, 1969) Sun & Weds Only Our Podcast

Regal Meridian:

Red Joan (Trevor Nunn) Fri-Thurs 

Northwest Film Forum:

Suburban Birds (Qiu Sheng) Fri-Tues Our Review
Arcadia (Paul Wright) Fri-Thurs 
Suburban Birds (Qiu Sheng) Starts Weds 

AMC Pacific Place:

Savage (Cui Siwei) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Always Miss You (Chen Hung-i) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Kalank (Abhishek Verman) Fri-Thurs 
El Chicano (Ben Bray) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Seattle:

Red Joan (Trevor Nunn) Fri-Thurs 
Maze (Stephen Burke) Fri-Thurs 
Family (Laura Steinel) Fri-Thurs 
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

Seattle Art Museum:

I’m All Right, Jack (John Boulting, 1959) Thurs Only 

SIFF Film Center:

Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché (Pamela B. Green) Fri-Sun 

AMC Southcenter:

El Chicano (Ben Bray) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Uptown:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
Hail Satan? (Penny Lane) Fri-Thurs 
High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Thurs Our Discussion 
Her Smell (Alex Ross Perry) Sun-Thurs 

Varsity Theatre:

Transit (Christian Petzold) Fri-Thurs Our Podcast
Hesburgh (Patrick Creadon) Fri-Thurs 
I’ll Take Your Dead (Chad Archibald) Fri-Thurs 
Tell It to the Bees (Annabel Jankel) Fri-Thurs 
True Grit (Henry Hathaway, 1969) Weds Only Our Podcast

Friday April 26 – Thursday May 2

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Featured Film:

Hotel by the River at the Northwest Film Forum

There’s a big new superhero movie this week of course, and the Grand Illusion has The Godfather Part II (good movie, imo) on 35mm, but if you know anything about us here at Seattle Screen Scene, you know that our Featured Film this week has got to be the latest from Hong Sangsoo, playing this weekend only at the Film Forum. It’s not our favorite Hong, something we talk about in a discussion which should be up here soon, nor even our favorite of the movies Hong made in 2018 (that would be Grass, which just opened in New York and should make its way here later this year) but it is definitely essential viewing.

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Family (Laura Steinel) Fri-Thurs 

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

Central Cinema:

Back to the Future Part II (Robert Zemeckis, 1989) Fri-Tues
Stargate (Roland Emmerich, 1994) Fri-Weds 

SIFF Egyptian:

Hail Satan? (Penny Lane) Fri-Thurs 

Grand Cinema:

Wild Nights with Emily (Madeleine Olnek) Fri-Thurs 
Woman at War (Benedikt Erlingsson) Fri-Thurs 
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979) Fri & Sat Only 
Jinn (Nijla Mumin) Sun Only 
A Bread Factory Part One (Patrick Wang) Tues Only 
A Bread Factory Part Two (Patrick Wang) Tues & Weds Only 

Grand Illusion Cinema:

The Godfather Part 2 (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974) Fri-Thurs 35mm
Penguin Highway (Hiroyasu Ishida) Sat & Sun Only Subtitled
Little Woods (Nia DaCosta) Sat-Mon Only 

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Jersey (Gowtam Tinnanuri) Fri-Thurs 
Kalank (Abhishek Verman) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Meridian:

Kalank (Abhishek Verman) Fri-Thurs 

Northwest Film Forum:

Hotel by the River (Hong Sangsoo) Fri-Sun 
The Eyes of Orson Welles (Mark Cousins) Sat & Sun Only 
Suburban Birds (Qiu Sheng) Starts Weds 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Kalank (Abhishek Verman) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Seattle:

William (Tim Disney) Fri-Thurs 
High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Thurs Our Discussion
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
Family (Laura Steinel) Fri-Thurs 

Seattle Art Museum:

The Ladykillers (Alexander Mackendrick, 1955) Thurs Only 

SIFF Film Center:

The Russian Five (Joshua Riehl) Fri-Sun 

AMC Southcenter:

Family (Laura Steinel) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Uptown:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
Rafiki (Wanuri Kahiu) Fri-Thurs 
High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Thurs Our Discussion

Varsity Theatre:

Transit (Christian Petzold) Fri-Thurs Our Podcast
Sunset (László Nemes) Fri-Thurs 

Friday April 19 – Thursday April 25

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Featured Film:

True Stories at the Northwest Film Forum

The highlights for this week on Seattle Screens are mostly movies I haven’t seen yet. Claire Denis’s High Life expands throughout the area, as does the Aretha Franklin doc Amazing Grace. The Pacific Place has the new Emily Dickinson film Wild Nights with Emily, while the new Mike Leigh joint plays at the Meridian and the Theatre Formerly Known as the Metro. The Cinerama has a whole series of anime, I’d recommend Mamoru Hosada’s Wolf Children as the one that doesn’t get revived all that often but is nonetheless as great as the best of the oft-screened Ghibli classics. SAM’s playing Kind Hearts and Coronets, if you’re in the mood to see Alec Guinness get killed as like a dozen different characters. And the Grand Illusion has an actual Jean Grémillon movie, can’t remember the last time we’ve had a chance to see one of those around here. But while I haven’t seen it yet, I have seen the video for “Wild Wild Life” and I’m gonna be super jealous of all of you who get to go see True Stories at the NWFF on Saturday night. It’s on 35mm!

Playing This Week:

AMC Alderwood:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

Central Cinema:

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (Terry Jones & Terry Gilliam, 1975) Fri-Weds
Night of the Living Dead (George Romero, 1968) Fri-Weds 

Cinerama:

Anime Film Series Fri-Thurs Full Program

SIFF Egyptian:

SPLIFF Film Fest Fri & Sat Only 
Hail Satan? (Penny Lane) Sun-Thurs 

Century Federal Way:

Manje Bistre 2 (Baljit Singh Deo) Fri-Thurs 

Grand Cinema:

High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Thurs 
Woman at War (Benedikt Erlingsson) Fri-Thurs 
Buddy (Heddy Honigmann) Fri-Thurs 
Cat Video Fest 2019 Fri-Thurs 
Kid Flicks Two Sat Only 
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (Terry Gilliam, 1998) Sat Only 
Anote’s Ark (Matthieu Rytz) Tues Only 
The New Frontier (Kanani Koster) Thurs Only 

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Penguin Highway (Hiroyasu Ishida) Fri–Thurs Dubbed Mon & Weds
Hagazussa (Lukas Feigelfeld) Fri, Sun, Mon, Weds & Thurs 
Little Woods (Nia DaCosta) Fri & Next Sat-Mon Only
Long Day’s Journey Into Night (Bi Gan) Sat & Sun Only Our Review In 2D
Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle (Danny Leiner, 2004) Sat Only 
Drone Cinema Film Festival – Selected Works Sat Only 
Pattes blanches (White Paws) (Jean Grémillon, 1949) Tues Only 

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Thurs 
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
Finding Julia (Igor Sunara) Fri-Thurs 
Chitralahari (Kishore Tirumala) Fri-Sun
Vellaipookal (Vivek Elangovan) Fri-Sun
Jersey (Gowtam Tinnanuri) Fri-Thurs 
Kalank (Abhishek Verman) Fri-Thurs 
Kanchana 3 (Raghava Lawrence) Fri & Sat Only
Athiran (Vivek) Sat & Sun Only 
Kavaludaari (Hemanth Rao) Sat & Sun Only 
Okko’s Inn (Kitarō Kōsaka) Mon & Tues Only Subtitled Tuesday

Regal Meridian:

Peterloo (Mike Leigh) Fri-Thurs 
Kalank (Abhishek Verman) Fri-Thurs 

Northwest Film Forum:

Ramen Shop (Eric Khoo) Fri-Thurs Our Review 
The Venerable W. (Barbet Schroeder) Fri & Sun Only 
Mosquita y Mari (Aurora Guerrero, 2011) Sat Only Director Q&A 
True Stories (David Byrne, 1986)  Sat Only 35mm
The Eyes of Orson Welles (Mark Cousins) Sun & Next Sat & Sun Only 
Tomorrow Never Knows (Adam Sekular) Weds Only Director Q&A
Cadence Video Poetry Festival Thurs Only 

AMC Pacific Place:

Wild Nights with Emily (Madeleine Olnek) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Kalank (Abhishek Verman) Fri-Thurs 

AMC Seattle:

Peterloo (Mike Leigh) Fri-Thurs 
High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Thurs 
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
The Brink (Alison Klayman) Fri-Thurs 

Seattle Art Museum:

Kind Hearts and Coronets (Robert Hamer, 1949) Thurs Only 

SIFF Film Center:

Babylon (Franco Rosso, 1980) Fri-Sun 

AMC Southcenter:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
Finding Julia (Igor Sunara) Fri-Thurs 

Regal Thornton Place:

High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Uptown:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
Diane (Kent Jones) Fri-Thurs 
High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Thurs 

Varsity Theatre:

Mary Magdalene (Garth Davis) Fri-Thurs 
Breaking Habits (Rob Ryan) Fri-Thurs 

In Wide Release:

Captain Marvel (Anna Boden & Ryan Fleck) Our Review Our Other Review 

Friday April 12 – Thursday April 18

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Featured Film:

Long Day’s Journey Into Night at the SIFF Uptown

It’s another very strong week on Seattle Screens, with runs of An Elephant Sitting Still and The Fate of Lee Khan continuing at the Northwest Film Forum, Yuen Woo-ping’s solid fight film Master Z: Ip Man Legacy opening at the Meridian and a couple of suburban theatres, and Mark Cousins’s very good doc The Eyes of Orson Welles beginning its sporadic run at the NWFF. There are also a bunch of solid rep options: Clue and Clueless at the Central Cinema, The Matrix and The General at the Grand, Life of Brian at the Uptown, and a whole bunch of films from 1999 at the Cinerama. But the must-see films of the week are Claire Denis’s Robert Pattinson-starring sci-fi movie High Life, opening at the Lincoln Square and the Uptown, and Bi Gan’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night, playing exclusively at the Uptown. I’m giving the edge here to Bi Gan, because I’ve actually seen his movie and it’s terrific. The hour-long continuous 3D take will get the headlines, but it’s the movie’s mood that will stick with you: film noir mystery and Wong Kar-wai romanticism condensed into a meandering labyrinth of memory and loss.

Playing This Week:

Central Cinema:

Clueless (Amy Heckerling, 1995) Fri-Tues
Clue (Jonathan Lynn, 1985) Fri-Weds 
Candyman (Bernard Rose, 1992) Weds Only 

Cinerama:

1999 Film Series Fri-Thurs Full Program

SIFF Egyptian:

Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 

Century Federal Way:

Master Z: Ip Man Legacy (Yuen Woo-ping) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Manje Bistre 2 (Baljit Singh Deo) Fri-Thurs 
Penguin Highway (Hiroyasu Ishida) Sun Only English Dubbed
Ben-Hur (William Wyler, 1959) Sun & Weds Only 

Grand Cinema:

The Aftermath (James Kent) Fri-Thurs 
Woman at War (Benedikt Erlingsson) Fri-Thurs 
The Matrix (Lilly and Lana Wachowski, 1999) Sat Only 
Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World (Catherine Bainbridge & Alfonso Maiorana) Sun Only 
Sharkwater Extinction (Rob Stewart) Tues Only 
The General (Buster Keaton, 1926) Weds Only 
Colour Me (Sherien Barsoum) Weds Only 
The Way He Looks (Daniel Ribeiro) Thurs Only 

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Ruben Brandt, The Collector (Milorad Krstic) Fri–Thurs 
Vampire Raiders Ninja Queen (Godfrey Ho, 1988) Sat Only VHS

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Thurs 
Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack) Fri-Thurs 
Majili (Shiva Nirvana) Fri-Thurs 
Manje Bistre 2 (Baljit Singh Deo) Fri-Thurs 
Chitralahari (Kishore Tirumala) Fri-Thurs 
The Tashkent Files (Vivek Agnihotri) Fri-Thurs 
Vellaipookal (Vivek Elangovan) Fri-Thurs 
Wedding Cha Shinema (Saleel Kulkarni) Sat & Sun Only 

Regal Meridian:

Master Z: Ip Man Legacy (Yuen Woo-ping) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Northwest Film Forum:

The Fate of Lee Khan (King Hu, 1973) Fri Only Our Review 
The Competition (Claire Simon) Fri-Sun 
Race (RAZA): A Cuban Documentary (Eric Corvalán, 2009) Sat Only 
An Elephant Sitting Still (Hu Bo)  Sun & Weds Only 
The Eyes of Orson Welles (Mark Cousins) Weds Only 
Slumber Party Massacre II (Deborah Brock, 1987) Thurs Only 
Cadence Video Poetry Festival Thurs Only 

AMC Seattle:

The Brink (Alison Klayman) Fri-Thurs 

Seattle Art Museum:

The Man in the White Suit (Alexander Mackendrick, 1951) Thurs Only 

SIFF Film Center:

In Search of Greatness (Gabe Polsky) Fri-Sun 

AMC Southcenter:

Master Z: Ip Man Legacy (Yuen Woo-ping) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Storm Boy (Shawn Seet) Fri-Thurs 

SIFF Uptown:

Long Day’s Journey Into Night (Bi Gan) Fri-Thurs Our Review 
High Life (Claire Denis) Fri-Thurs 
BoneBat “Comedy of Horrors” Film Fest 2019 Sat Only 
Life of Brian (Terry Jones, 1979) Thurs Only 

Varsity Theatre:

Mary Magdalene (Garth Davis) Fri-Thurs 
Ben-Hur (William Wyler, 1959) Weds Only 

In Wide Release:

Captain Marvel (Anna Boden & Ryan Fleck) Our Review Our Other Review 

Black Mother (Khalik Allah, 2018)

black mother

In Khalik Allah’s debut documentary, Field Niggas, the focus was precise. He returned again and again to a single street corner – the power of the film derived from his commitment to capturing this environment, the specific light, and the people who roamed about. His camera was up close to his subjects, his gaze meeting them head-on. His follow-up, Black Mother, is in every sense a much more expansive, diffuse experience. Instead of a single street corner, he aims to capture an entire country.

The approach is the same – the images and sound are not synchronized, allowing for a certain abstraction, where the viewer can make associations and connections for themselves. But Black Mother is a much more challenging project, and this is because of a crucial difference. In his first film, Allah was able to focus on his gifts for portraiture and his background in photography. His subjects became his organizing principle, and their presence sustained the film’s logic and atmosphere for over its running time. It never felt forced. Its scope felt right. Faced with the whole of Jamaica to try and make sense of, Allah strains in organizing his material. The film is divided into four sections – three trimesters and a birth. Searching, he forces poetic motifs and associations in order to guide him. His subjects hold books to point to the island’s colonized past. School girls are juxtaposed with prostitutes. Water imagery abounds. There is death, and there is birth. Essentially, the design feels less intuitive, a solution to a problem.

But Black Mother does not feel programmatic or calculated, even if Allah’s structure is somewhat labored. This is because his approach remains open, allowing for dissonance. Think of the Chinese store-owners brought up early on in the film. The voiceover speaks to Chinese people buying up hotels and taking over Jamaica, a new colonization. To illustrate this Allah shows us some Chinese store-owners at work, frustrated, tired, reacting to his camera, and finally giving him the peace sign. The montage is conflicted, and it reminds one of his previous film and its treatment of the police. In that film, Allah voiced his opinion of the police, filming them with as much as respect as his other subjects, but his voice became one of many, and all throughout the film his subjects violently disagreed and said so. With the Chinese store-owners, he strives to complicate and elucidate this subjects’ voiceover through the imagery, finally arriving at a point where it simply remains inconclusive – how should one feel about this? There is contradiction and the note is left unresolved.

In Field Niggas, Allah was frequently on the soundtrack, asking questions, his reflection was seen on bodega storefronts; he became a part of the night, a member of the cast, his voice a part of the film’s choral patchwork. While his latest film incorporates footage from his own family, and part of the impetus for filming Jamaica is his own connection to it, aside from a few stray bits of dialogue and an image here or there, he has more or less removed himself from the film’s universe. This allows for an analytical distance toward his subject, submerging the images of his family in a grand design, just another people of the island, allowing him to develop the thematic framework he feels is necessary to do justice to what he feels is important. He no longer needs to be seen or heard for his presence to be felt, letting his camera distance carry the moral weight of his gaze. The montage becomes his tool – the structure allows him to search and understand, maybe even flail about a little bit.

We return to the structure, the trimesters and the birth. In the first three trimesters, he has given us a societal and spiritual context, returning again and again to Jamaican Woman. His metaphor is undoubtedly a male one, he frames himself as Son to Mother, his return to Jamaica an attempt to understand his roots, but it registers as respectful and his gaze is never compromised. Finally, Allah films the mother give birth to a son, images of running water flowing everlasting, while the mother cries in pain, making literal the struggles of all the women he has filmed so far, the prayers heard on the soundtrack earlier signaling a spiritual rebirth, not only for himself but for all of those on the island. It’s in moments like this where the structure pays off and Allah’s desire to capture it all almost feel possible.

Black Mother is currently playing at the Northwest Film Forum