Friday October 30 – Thursday November 5

Featured Film:

Jean Renoir Double Feature at the Seattle Art Museum

Tying in with their exhibit Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art, the Seattle Art Museum this Wednesday night only is presenting, on 35mm, a pair of films by director Jean Renoir, who in addition to be one of the greatest filmmakers of all-time, also happened to be the son of painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir. A Day in the Country was shot in 1936 but left unfinished, it was assembled a decade later into a 40 minute featurette and remains one of the more astonishingly perfect short story films. French Cancan, from 1954, is a glorious celebration of color and music, intersecting love triangles and rectangles forming around the invention of the 19th century’s most scandalously silly dance craze. They are two of Renoir’s very best films, and the combination is one of the unmissable film events of the season.
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Playing This Week:

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Krush Groove (Michael Schultz, 1985) Sun Only Q & A with Kurtis Blow

Central Cinema:

Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960) Fri-Tues
Hausu (Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1977) Fri, Sun-Weds
Unity (Shaun Monson) Weds Only

SIFF Cinema Egyptian:

Animation Show of Shows (Various) Fri-Thurs

Century Federal Way:

My Fair Lady (George Cukor, 1964) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

A Brilliant Young Mind (Morgan Matthews) Fri-Thurs
Freeheld (Peter Sollett) Fri-Thurs
Deathgasm (Jason Lei Howden) Fri & Sat Night
Eyes of the Totem (W.S. Van Dyke, 1927) Tues Only
A Brave Heart: The Lizzie Velasquez Story (Sara Hirsh Bordo) Thurs Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Boruto (Hiroyuki Yamashita) Fri-Thurs
VHS Über Alles presents Spookies (Brendan Faulkner & Thomas Doran, 1986) Fri Only VHS
The Sprocket Society presents Halloween Monster Mania, featuring Invasion of the Saucer-Men (Edward L. Cahn, 1957) Sat Only 16mm

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Kanche (Krish) Fri-Thurs
Sher (Mallikarjun) Fri-Thurs
Shaandaar (Vikas Bahl) Fri-Thurs
My Fair Lady (George Cukor, 1964) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Goodbye Mr. Loser (Yan Fei & Peng Damo) Fri-Thurs
Dancin’ It’s On! (David Winters) Fri-Thurs

Northwest Film Forum:

Spookhaus 3: Spook There It Is A Night of Fear, Mayhem, and Debauchery Fri & Sat Only
60 Second Film Festival Sat Only
Jane B. par Agnès V. (Agnès Varda, 1988) Mon-Thurs
Kung Fu Master (Agnès Varda, 1988) Mon-Thurs
Festen (The Celebration) (Thomas Vinterburg, 1998) Tues Only
Jaco (Stephen Kijak & Paul Marchand) Weds Only

AMC Pacific Place:

The Witness (Ahn Sang-hoon) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Dancin’ It’s On! (David Winters) Fri-Thurs
Felix Manalo (Joel Lamangan) Fri-Thurs
Freaks of Nature (Robbie Pickering) Fri-Thurs
Ladrones (Joe Menendez) Fri-Thurs
Shaandaar (Vikas Bahl) Fri-Thurs
Shareek (Navaniat Singh) Fri-Thurs

Scarecrow Video Screening Room:

The Night Strangler (Dan Curtis, 1973) Fri Only
The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980) Sat Only
Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979) Tues Only
Loving (Irvin Kershner, 1970) Weds Only
Notorious (Alfred Hitchcock, 1946) Thurs Only

Seattle Art Museum:

A Day in the Country and French Cancan (Jean Renoir, 1936 & 1955) Weds Only 35mm Double Feature
One Way Street (Hugo Fregonese, 1950) Thurs Only 35mm

Landmark Seven Gables:

Experimenter (Michael Almereyda) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

The Keeping Room (Daniel Barber) Fri-Thurs
Tales of Halloween (Various) Fri-Thurs

Sundance Cinemas Seattle:

Rosenwald (Aviva Kemper) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Cinema Uptown:

Oklahoma! (Fred Zinnemann, 1955) Tues Only Our Review
The Latin Explosion: A New America (Matthew O’Neill & Jon Alpert) Weds Only

In Wide Release:

Bridge of Spies (Steven Spielberg) Our Review
The Martian (Ridley Scott) Our Review
Crimson Peak (Guillermo del Toro) Our Review
Steve Jobs (Danny Boyle) Our Review
Sicario (Denis Villeneuve) Our Review
The Visit (M. Night Shyamalan) Our Review
Trainwreck (Judd Apatow) Our Review
Straight Outta Compton (F. Gary Gray) Our Review

Oklahoma! (Fred Zinnemann, 1955)

The following review of Oklahoma! was originally published in March, 2014 on my website The End of Cinema.

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II are generally credited with ushering in a Golden Age of musical theatre, this 1943 play marking the first truly integrated show, with music, lyrics and story seamlessly interwoven. Of course it wasn’t the first (Show Boat did much the same thing 15 years earlier, to say nothing of the operettas from the 19th century onward that did as well, but whatever), but it was a huge hit, inspiring many imitators, some of which are actually good. Similarly, the 1955 film adaptation was followed by a new form of musical film: more or less direct translations of stage musicals, often excruciatingly long, presented as roadshow extravaganzas (more expensive tickets, super widescreen formats, elaborate sets and locations). These films, increasingly bloated and dull, eventually killed the musical as a viable American film genre and played no small role in bankrupting the studio system that had been in place in Hollywood since the 1920s.

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This Week at the Multiplex

CrimsonPeak_trailer

After ten days in Vancouver and another couple of weeks trying to recover from ten days in Vancouver, I’d fallen quite a bit behind on the early stages of autumn multiplex season, the time of year when superheroes and cartoons recede from Seattle Screens to be replaced by middling movies for grownups, long shot award hopefuls, and films that star actors people like me (old people) grew up with. So over three trips to the multiplex this past week, I caught up with five of the first wave of what will amount to the (self-proclaimed) best Hollywood has to offer in 2015. More of the same will follow between now and then end of January, when the stragglers of Oscar season will finally make their way onto Seattle Screens, but if the early returns are any indication, this is shaping up to be a solid year for the American cinema. And when you consider that it’s also a banner year for international film, the year in film 2015 is shaping up quite nicely indeed.

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Attack On Titan: End of the World (Shinji Higuchi, 2015)

attack on titan pic 6

Seattle Screen Scene’s review of the first film can be found here.

Just a few weeks ago, the first Attack on Titan played in American screens. It was a frequently disturbing film that took the Titan universe and re-imagined it in tokusatsu terms. Because it appears that the latest trend in Japanese cinema is to take these manga/anime properties and milk them for all they’re worth, the film adaptation was split into two parts (see also: Parasyte, Bokura Ga Ita, etc.). This is where the problems begin.

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Friday October 23 – Thursday October 29

Featured Film:

The Leopard Man in the Scarecrow Video Screening Room

Continuing their October series of Val Lewton masterpieces (their Cat People double feature was our Featured Film a couple weeks ago), Scarecrow Video pairs The Ghost Ship with The Leopard Man this Wednesday night, October 28th. The latter is one of director Jacques Tourneur’s unsung classics. The plot is stripped down to almost nothing and the structure is simplicity itself (65 minutes long and four deaths, roughly one every 15 minutes), but not characterization: there are at least a dozen fully-realized humans (and one cat) here, pointing the way forward to Tourneur’s evocation of small-town life in his masterpiece Stars in My Crown. Unlike Cat People, there’s no goofy mythological/Freudian underpinning to the violence. A man sees death once and then finds he cannot prevent himself from killing, again and again. A grim prognosis for the future for a film released in 1943, with pretty much the entire world at war.
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Playing This Week:

Central Cinema:

Hocus Pocus (Kenny Ortega, 1993) Fri-Tues
A Nightmare On Elm Street (Wes Craven, 1984) Fri-Weds
Find Me (David and Kathi Peters) Weds Only

SIFF Cinema Egyptian:

Victoria (Sebastian Schipper) Fri-Thurs Our Review 
Deathgasm (Jason Lei Howden) Fri & Sat Midnight

Century Federal Way:

Dracula English & Spanish Double Feature (Tod Browning & George Melford, 1931) Sun & Weds Only

Grand Cinema:

A Brilliant Young Mind (Morgan Matthews) Fri-Thurs
Meet the Patels (Ravi & Geeta Patel) Fri-Thurs
The Final Girls (Todd Strauss-Schulson) Fri & Sat Only
Court (Chaitanya Tamhane) Tues Only
Attack on Titan Part 2 (Shinji Higuchi) Tues Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

Lifeforce (Tobe Hooper, 1985) Fri, Sat & Tues Only 35mm
Extraordinary Tales (Raul Garcia) Fri-Thurs
Scarecrow Video presents Shock & Awe: A Secret No-Budget Thriller Fest Sun Only Video
Jack Pierce, The Maker of Monsters (Strephon Taylor) Mon Only
The Best of The VCR That Dripped Blood Thurs Only VHS

Landmark Guild 45th:

Freeheld (Peter Sollett) Fri-Thurs
My Fair Lady (George Cukor, 1964) Sun & Weds Only
Attack on Titan Part 2 (Shinji Higuchi) Tues Only

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Kanche (Krish) Fri-Thurs
Bruce Lee – The Fighter (Srinu Vaitla) Fri-Thurs
Shaandaar (Vikas Bahl) Fri-Thurs
Dracula English & Spanish Double Feature (Tod Browning & George Melford, 1931) Sun & Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Goodbye Mr. Loser (Yan Fei & Peng Damo) Fri-Thurs
The Algerian (Giovanni Zelko) Fri-Thurs

Northwest Film Forum:

The Decline of Western Civilization Part II: The Metal Years (Penelope Spheeris, 1988) Sat Only Our Interview
Bezango, WA (Louise Amandes and Ron Austin) Sat Only Filmmakers in Attendance
Ben Gibbard’s Secret Screening Sat Only
Kurt Cobain About a Son (AJ Schnack, 2006) Sun Only
Spookhaus 3: Spook There It Is A Night of Fear, Mayhem, and Debauchery Thurs-Halloween Only

AMC Pacific Place:

Dracula English & Spanish Double Feature (Tod Browning & George Melford, 1931) Sun & Weds Only

Paramount Theatre:

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Robert Weine, 1919) Mon Only

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Must Date the Playboy (Mae Cruz-Alviar) Fri-Thurs
Ladrones (Joe Menendez) Fri-Thurs
Shaandaar (Vikas Bahl) Fri-Thurs
Shareek (Navaniat Singh) Fri-Thurs

Scarecrow Video Screening Room:

Troll (John Carl Buechler, 1986) Fri Only
Troll Hunter (André Øvredal, 2011) Sat Only
Chris Marker Group Mon Only
The Hunger (Tony Scott, 1983) Tues Only
The Leopard Man (Jacques Tourner, 1943) Weds Only
The Ghost Ship (Mark Robson, 1943) Weds Only
Monster Mash Thurs Only

Seattle Art Museum:

Johnny Stool Pigeon (William Castle, 1949) Thurs Only 35mm

Landmark Seven Gables:

Beasts of No Nation (Cary Fukanaga) Fri-Thurs
Meru (Jimmy Chin & Chai Vasarhelyi) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

Deathgasm (Jason Lei Howden) Fri-Thurs
Stray Dog (Debra Granik) Fri-Sun Only
The Decline of Western Civilization Part Three (Penelope Spheeris) Mon Only Our Interview

AMC Southcenter:

Dracula English & Spanish Double Feature (Tod Browning & George Melford, 1931) Sun & Weds Only

Sundance Cinemas Seattle:

Labyrinth of Lies (Giulio Ricciarelli) Fri-Thurs
The Amazing Nina Simone (Jeff L. Lieberman) Fri-Thurs
Meet the Patels (Ravi & Geeta Patel) Fri-Thurs

Regal Thornton Place:

Dracula English & Spanish Double Feature (Tod Browning & George Melford, 1931) Sun & Weds Only

SIFF Cinema Uptown:

Goodnight Mommy (Ulrich Seidel) Fri-Thurs
French Cinema Now Festival 2015 Fri-Thurs Full Program 
Stray Dog (Debra Granik) Mon-Thurs Only

Varsity Theatre:

Dracula (Tod Browning, 1931) Sun & Weds Only
Halloween (John Carpenter, 1978) Thurs Only

VIFF 2015: The Assassin (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 2015)

the assassin

Hou Hsiao-hsien structures his new film, The Assassin, as a sort of once upon a time tale. It begins with narration, a mix of the historical and the mythic, and I am at once immersed in a dream-like tale that will, indeed, haunt my memory, just as history and myth so often do, becoming reference points in my present, even when I am not consciously aware of their influence.

It is ninth century China, and political struggle infects the kingdom. The royal court fears a strong, militarized outer province, Weibo; too much delegated power is a threat to the court’s own strength. Weibo, with a century of nearly complete self-governance, fears a reduction in its autonomy. It is a struggle that absorbs everyone.

And yet within this kingdom, there is a mother who tells another story, the story of a single bird. Caged and alone, the bird sits silent, a small stranger in the human world around it, unable to sing to those so unlike itself. Its human keepers feel compassion for it and give it a mirror. Recognizing something like itself, it sings a song of sadness. It dances, and then it dies.

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Friday October 16 – Thursday October 22

Featured Film:

The Forbidden Room at the Northwest Film Forum

One of the best films of the year opens this week at the Northwest Film Forum, Guy Maddin’s phantasmagoric ode to the weird and beautiful in cinema. A kaleidoscopic accordion of stories, about thirty different narratives, embedded within each other and branching across time, space, genre and logic, The Forbidden Room is without a doubt the most Guy Maddin film ever made, and probably his best too. We reported on it from Vancouver on The George Sanders Show, and Mike’s review is here.
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Playing This Week:

Central Cinema:

Ghostbusters (Ivan Reitman, 1984) Fri-Tues
The Evil Dead (Sam Raimi, 1982) Fri-Weds

SIFF Cinema Egyptian:

Victoria (Sebastian Schipper) Fri-Thurs Our Review

Century Federal Way:

The Throne (Lee Joon-ik) Fri-Thurs

Grand Cinema:

Coming Home (Zhang Yimou) Fri-Thurs
Peace Officer (Brad Barber & Scott Christopherson) Fri-Thurs
Run Free – The True Story of Caballo Blanco (Sterling Noren) Sun Only
Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine (Alex Gibney) Tues Only
Young Frankenstein (Mel Brooks, 1974) Weds Only
Attack on Titan Part 2 (Shinji Higuchi) Weds & Thurs Only

Grand Illusion Cinema:

The American Genre Film Archive and Something Weird Video present Smut Without Smut: The Mad Love Life of a Hot Vampire & The Haunted P***y (Ray Dennis Steckler, 1976 & Doris Wishman, 1971) Fri Only
A Nightmare On Elm Street (Wes Craven, 1984) Sat & Mon Only 35mm
A Nightmare On Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge (Jack Sholder, 1985) Sat & Tues Only 35mm
Rampaging Mutant 35mm Triple Feature Pizza Party Sun Only
Science Crazed (Ron Switzer, 1989) Weds Only
Valley of the Sasquatch and Creature from Black Lake (John Portanova, 2015 & Joy N. Houck Jr., 1976) Thurs Only Filmmaker in Attendance 35mm

Landmark Guild 45th:

Freeheld (Peter Sollett) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Freeheld (Peter Sollett) Fri-Thurs
Bruce Lee – The Fighter (Srinu Vaitla) Fri-Thurs
Pyaar Ka Punchnama 2 (Luv Ranjan) Fri-Thurs
Rudrama Devi (Gunasekhar) Fri-Thurs
Back to the Future Triple Feature (Robert Zemeckis) Weds Only

Regal Meridian:

Goodbye Mr. Loser (Yan Fei & Peng Damo) Fri-Thurs
Ladrones (Joe Menendez) Fri-Thurs

Northwest Film Forum:

The Forbidden Room (Guy Maddin) Fri-Thurs Our Review
Bring Me the Head of Tim Horton (Guy Maddin) Sat Afternoon Only
Ben Gibbard in Conversation with Lynn Shelton about scoring Laggies Sat Only
Urgh! A Music War (Derek Burbidge, 1981) Sat Only 35mm
Head (Bob Rafelson, 1968) Sun Only
The Seattle South Asian Film Festival Mon & Tues Full Program
The Seattle Process with Brett Hamil  Weds Only
Shredder Orpheus (Robert McGinley, 1989) Thurs Only

AMC Pacific Place:

Freeheld (Peter Sollett) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Etiquette for Mistresses (Chito S. Roño) Fri-Thurs
Ladrones (Joe Menendez) Fri-Thurs

Scarecrow Video Screening Room:

Goodbye, Lenin! (Wolfgang Becker, 2003) Fri Only
The Invisible Man (James Whale, 1933) Sun Only
The Invisible Woman (A. Edward Sutherland & Joe May, 1940) Sun Only
Spaced Invaders (Patrick Read Johnson, 1990) Mon Only
Silence of the Lambs (Jonathan Demme, 1991) Tues Only
Night of the Demon (Jacques Tourneur, 1957) Weds Only
The 39 Steps (Alfred Hitchcock, 1935) Thurs Only

Seattle Art Museum:

Pitfall (André de Toth, 1948) Thurs Only 35mm

Landmark Seven Gables:

Beasts of No Nation (Cary Fukanaga) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

The Seattle South Asian Film Festival Fri-Sun Full Program
Archie’s Betty (Gerald Peary) Weds Only
The Decline of Western Civilization Part One (Penelope Spheeris) Thurs Only Our Interview

Sundance Cinemas Seattle:

Mississippi Grind (Ryan Fleck & Anna Boden) Fri-Thurs
Meet the Patels (Ravi & Geeta Patel) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Cinema Uptown:

Goodnight Mommy (Ulrich Seidel) Fri-Thurs
My Fair Lady (George Cukor, 1964) Tues Only
French Cinema Now Festival 2015 Starts Thurs Full Program

Varsity Theatre:

Time Out of Mind (Oren Moverman) Fri-Thurs

VIFF 2015: Domestic Intimacies: Ixcanul (Jayro Bustamante, 2015) and 45 Years (Andrew Haigh, 2015)

Maria and MotherGeoff sitting with Kate

Preface:
Human, and faced with a sea of things, images, stories, characters, all bobbing this way and that, slipping and sliding away from me, I seek some rope to grasp, a line that might form for me a connection between the things. And if I can only pull that line taut, I might be able to stay above the waves and see a pattern in the flotsam.

It isn’t really flotsam, of course, that wave of films I found my fest-inexperienced self submerged beneath at this year’s Vancouver International Film Festival.  Each film in itself is a unique, individual thing, only forced, by necessity into a mass. And we should be used, in any case, to consuming art in the mass, collective form – in a museum, in an anthology – curated and then presented to us as somehow related objects.  Even if we pick our way through an anthology or skip rather guiltily past the 13th century wing of the museum and make straight for the Impressionists, we are still aware of all of these disparate things gathered together under an umbrella of a particular Thing, and, invited to do so, the pattern seeking mind all the more eagerly links themes, ideas, modes, shapes, colors.

Artists, of course, do not live in a vacuum, and their works may be, certainly, drawing from other works, even without conscious intent. Still, it would be difficult to say 8th century Chinese landscapes were drawing any influence from Byzantine frescoes. And yet, place such a set of landscapes next to a few frescoes, I’d surely spot a pattern. I can’t help it; I put them together, and the one will converse with the other.

And so, while yet understanding the potential folly of such conjunctions and conversations, I can’t help but make them and hope that such a convergence will illuminate the individual objects themselves.

Jayro Bustamante’s Guatemalan film, Ixcanul, has very little in common with Andrew Haigh’s thoroughly British film, 45 Years, and yet, as the VIFF programming gods would have it, I saw them back to back on a Saturday afternoon early this October, and they nestle comfortably together in my mind, chapter 1 and chapter 2 in a little anthology of Domestic Intimacies.   Continue reading

VIFF 2015: Mountains May Depart (Jia Zhangke, 2015)

RGB tiff image by MetisIP

 Part of our coverage of the 2015 Vancouver International Film Festival. This review is by Vancouver-based critic Neil Bahadur.

The most ambitious film so far from the great director Jia Zhangke, working in a gorgeous, cyclical structure that it might make it too easy to disregard the film’s more provocative aspects. Jia has been obsessed with the globalization of China since day one, but what is different here is the syphoning of aspects of contemporary China into three broken segments, each of which purport to be a narrative-driven family melodrama. But what seems youthful naivete is rather the fading of a culture, what seems disillusionment of middle-age is the economic collapse of the world we live in today. . . so the earnestness of the film’s final third is the only response possible to the removal of culture entirely. Jia’s 2025 is a fairy-tale world, a complete fantasy wherein this (actually very conventional) three-act structure, surrealism is fully integrated into this narrative sense. And because of the disparity between this part and the first two, this approach disconcerts rather than shocks or provokes. The movie is a series of Brechtian devices which exhaust themselves, and so the only option left is to wear its heart on its sleeve.

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Friday October 9 – Thursday October 15

Featured Film:

Cat People Double Feature at Scarecrow Video

As part of a series of excellent horror films featured this month on their Screening Room calendar, this Wednesday only Scarecrow Video presents a double feature of Val Lewton classics. The original 1942 Cat People, directed by Jacques Tourneur, is one of the great horror films of the studio era, while 1944’s sequel, The Curse of the Cat People, directed by Robert Wise, is something altogether singular, less a horror film than a meditation on the ways children cope with trauma and loss, a haunted fable and arguably the best film Wise ever made.
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Playing This Week:

Ark Lodge Cinemas:

Moose: The Movie (G. Logan Dellinger) Fri-Thurs

Central Cinema:

The Lost Boys (Joel Schumacher, 1987) Fri-Mon
Twilight (Catherine Hardwicke, 2008) Fri-Tues
Paper Tigers (James Redford) Tues Only

SIFF Cinema Egyptian:

Seattle Lesbian & Gay Film Festival Fri-Thurs Full Program

Grand Cinema:

Tacoma Film Festival Fri-Thurs Full Program

Grand Illusion Cinema:

The Creeping Garden (Tim Grabham & Jasper Sharp) Fri-Thurs
The Green Slime (Kinji Fukasaku, 1968) Fri & Sat Only 16mm

Landmark Guild 45th:

Freeheld (Peter Sollett) Fri-Thurs

Cinemark Lincoln Square:

Freeheld (Peter Sollett) Fri-Thurs
Talvar (Meghna Gulzar) Fri-Thurs
Rudrama Devi (Gunasekhar) Fri-Thurs
Monty Python & the Holy Grail (Terry Gilliam & Terry Jones, 1975) Sun & Weds Only Quote-Along

Northwest Film Forum:

Seattle Lesbian & Gay Film Festival Fri-Thurs Full Program

AMC Pacific Place:

Coming Home (Zhang Yimou) Fri-Thurs
Lost in Hong Kong (Xu Zheng) Fri-Thurs
Saving Mr. Wu (Ding Sheng) Fri-Thurs
Freeheld (Peter Sollett) Fri-Thurs

Regal Parkway Plaza:

Etiquette for Mistresses (Chito S. Roño) Fri-Thurs

Scarecrow Video Screening Room:

They Live (John Carpenter, 1988) Fri Only
Zeder (Pupi Avati, 1983) Sat Only
Kenny & Co. (Don Coscarelli, 1976) Sun Only
The Brood (David Cronenberg, 1979) Mon Only
Rosemary’s Baby (Roman Polanski, 1968) Tues Only
Cat People (Jacques Tourneur, 1942) Weds Only
Curse of the Cat People (Robert Wise, 1944) Weds Only
Gary Larson’s Tales from the Far Side (Marv Newland, 1994) Thurs Only

Landmark Seven Gables:

Meru (Jimmy Chin & Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Film Center:

The Quay Brothers in 35mm (Stephen & Timothy Quay) Fri-Thurs 35mm
Final Girls (Todd Strauss-Schulson) Fri-Sun Only

Sundance Cinemas Seattle:

Yakuza Apocalypse (Takashi Miike) Fri-Thurs
Peace Officer (Brad Barber & Scott Christopherson) Fri-Thurs
Meet the Patels (Ravi & Geeta Patel) Fri-Thurs

SIFF Cinema Uptown:

Goodnight Mommy (Ulrich Seidel) Fri-Thurs
Seattle Polish Film Festival Fri-Thurs Full Program
Final Girls (Todd Strauss-Schulson) Mon-Thurs Only
A Brilliant Young Mind (Morgan Matthews) Fri-Thurs
The Heart of the Game (Ward Serrill) Tues Only
This Changes Everything (Avi Lewis) Weds Only Naomi Klein in person

Varsity Theatre:

Time Out of Mind (Oren Moverman) Fri-Thurs
Trash (Stephen Daldry & Christian Duurvoort) Fri-Thurs
Finders Keepers (Bryan Carberry & Clay Tweel) Fri-Thurs
Seattle Latino Film Festival Fri-Sun
The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies Extended Edition (Peter Jackson) Tues Only